black and minority ethnic people

Teenage drinking and interethnic friendships

Report that explores the links between young people’s interethnic friendships and their drinking patterns and behaviours.

Social networks, poverty and ethnicity

Paper that briefly reviews evidence and current thinking about the links between social networks and poverty, and explores how dimensions of ‘race’ and ethnicity affect how these operate for people living in the UK.

It focuses mainly on the experiences of black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities and identifies how social network effects contribute to the occurrence of poverty, coping strategies and routes out of poverty.

Improving support for black and minority ethnic (BME) carers (IRISS Insights, no.7)

One of a series of reports providing the social services workforce with brief, accessible and practice-oriented summaries of published evidence on key topics. Developed through a process of rapid appraisal, Insights seek to highlight the practice implications of research evidence and answer the 'So what does this mean in practice?' question for each topic reviewed. This Insight focuses on improving support for black and minority ethnic (BME) carers.

SCIE research briefing 35: black and minority ethnic people with dementia and their access to support and services

Briefing which discusses the barriers currently faced by BME people in accessing dementia care services and some of the ways in which services can become better at responding to the needs of BME people in their locality.

Legitimacy and procedural justice in prisons

A functioning correctional system depends on the orderly reproduction of a stable and acceptable prison environment. The argument in this paper has two parts: first, a key factor in the social order of a prison is the legitimacy of the prison regime in the eyes of inmates; and second, the legitimacy of authorities depends in large part upon the procedural fairness with which officers treat prisoners.

Effectively engaging and involving seldom-heard groups (IRISS Insights, no.2)

One of a series of reports providing the social services workforce with brief, accessible and practice-oriented summaries of published evidence on key topics.

Developed through a process of rapid appraisal, Insights seek to highlight the practice implications of research evidence and answer the 'So what does this mean in practice?' question for each topic reviewed.

This Insight looks at the evidence around effectively involving those in seldom-heard groups.

Muslims and community cohesion in Bradford

The research investigates factors that either enhanced or undermined community cohesion in two local wards in Bradford, where there were established Muslim communities and where Muslim migrants had recently arrived.

Women, faith and social cohesion: models for building cohesive communities

This report examines the role of women and faith in building cohesive communities and provides models for developing and evaluating social cohesion activity. It uses a participatory approach with women from diverse backgrounds in Bradford, to examine the role of women and faith in building cohesive communities. The term 'community cohesion' is increasingly used in UK policy, which emphasises strengthening civic society through local action.

Participation and community on Bradford's traditionally white estates: a community research project

An interactive research project with residents of two traditionally white estates in Bradford, this study explores their perceptions of community and attitudes towards participation, both on the estates and with external agencies. It explores why, given the partial achievements and commitment to improving the lives of some of the most excluded social groups in the UK, government has been unable to generate self-sustaining improvements in these kinds of settings.

A national study of ageing and HIV (50 plus)

This report contains the views and concerns of people with HIV aged 50 and over, living into an old age that many of them never expected to see. The social care needs of this rapidly growing group have not previously been addressed in the UK. The 50 Plus research project asked 410 of them – 1 in 25 of all those currently being seen for care – for their views on their current and future lives. The report also analysed the resulting data to compare three of the largest subgroups: gay/bisexual men, black African women and white heterosexuals.