adults

Guide that looks at how social care services can improve access to adults with autism.

It is based on research that explores the barriers to services experienced by people with autism. It covers people with autism, whether or not they also have a learning disability.

The guide suggests ways services can improve, identifying how best to meet the goals of the government's autism strategy.

Paper that sets important issues relating to positive risk-taking in adult social care in a legal context; considers how current care provision impacts on the human rights of service users; and analyses the extent to which the present regulatory and commissioning frameworks stifle or encourage risk-taking in adult social care.

Paper that explores the relationship between policy initiatives regarding risk-taking in adult care and its claim to reflect user experience; argues that these policy initiatives are driven by the imperative of rationalising risk management; and claims that such policies are not a response to user demand and that more research is needed to evaluate the attitudes of users of adult care to risk-taking.

Report commissioned to inform current debates on the future delivery of adult services. It reveals a strong body of evidence pointing to the importance of local partnerships, local leadership and outcomes-based commissioning in improving services for the people who need them.

Report that sets out findings from new research on the relationships between the literacy and numeracy levels of older adults and the extent of disadvantage in later life.

The research consisted of a review of the literature and secondary analysis of a quantitative data source on older adults.

Based on a review of the existing literature and IPC’s own experience in working with local authorities reviewing their safeguarding procedures, this discussion paper looks at the relationship between personalisation, safeguarding and commissioning.

Booklet to help a child and trusted adult to talk together about what is happening in their life. It is written for children, but at the end of each section is a part written for adults.

It is for children who live in all sorts of families - those living with relatives, children in care, those who have a parent in prison, or worried about a parent or carer drinking too much.

For more examples of Citizen Leadership, see the Gallery of Good Practice Examples in Citizen Leadership.

The Good Life: Positive Attitudes Group is a group of adults with learning disabilities whose work improves the lives of people like them.

One in a series of research briefings about preventive care and support for adults. Prevention is broadly defined to include a wide range of services that: promote independence, prevent or delay the deterioration of well being resulting from ageing, illness or disability, and delay the need for more costly and intensive services.

Briefing for family carers supporting an adult with severe learning disabilities and behaviour described as challenging. It will help people understand what to expect from local services.