integrated services

This study aims to evaluate the different integrated approaches to health care services supporting older people in care homes, and identify barriers and facilitators to integrated working.

Briefing that sets out the potential areas for local action; the questions local commissioners might ask themselves and the evidence that may help with the answers; potential indicators for identifying areas for improvements and for tracking progress; and what the national data suggests in these key areas.

Report commissioned to inform current debates on the future delivery of adult services. It reveals a strong body of evidence pointing to the importance of local partnerships, local leadership and outcomes-based commissioning in improving services for the people who need them.

A review of shared services across the Clyde Valley which sets out a “road map” for the eight Clyde Valley authorities (East Dunbartonshire, West Dunbartonshire, North Lanarkshire, South Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, East Renfrewshire, Glasgow, Inverclyde) to move to a model of integrated service delivery in certain key areas over the next five years. Its recommendations include:

Health Boards and Local Authorities recognise that to improve the joint working performance of the professionals within the services, there is a requirement to develop structures to support joint working including joint funding of services, joint management and joint training. This tool intends to focus on the joint training arrangements and to augment the joint training activities, by developing opportunities for a shared learning within integrated services.

Report based on evidence gathered from local authority youth services inspections which occurred as part of Ofsted's joint area reviews of children's and young people's services from 2005 to 2008. It discusses the quality and impact of youth work and follows developments in the introduction of integrated youth support.

Publication containing examples of innovative working practice where children's services are integrated with health and arranging them into a series of case studies. It is intended to support all those involved in the planning, commissioning and delivery of services through Sure Start Children's Centres.

The Assessment, Intervention and Moving on project (AIM) provides a framework for the initial assessment of young people with sexually harmful behaviours in Greater Manchester to assist professionals to open a dialogue between partner assessors, young people and their families/carers, and to create consistency of assessments across agencies. AIM uses an assessment model to look at offence-specific factors, developmental factors, family/carer and environment/ community dynamics.

This study used five in depth case studies using documentary analysis, interviews and structured case response methods. The study aimed to consider the impact of the move towards integrated children's service arrangements on how social care services for deaf children and their families are delivered and whether these arrangements create opportunities or threats to identify, assess and meet social care needs. Although good practice was identified, there were concerns about the quality, availability and appropriateness of social care services.