integrated services

The Common Assessment Framework (CAF) is a standardised approach for the assessment of children and their families, to facilitate the early identification of additional needs and to promote a coordinated service response.

The study aims to explore the impact of the CAF on both children and families and professionals, and examines how far a ‘bottom up’ cost calculation methodology could be extended to include the costs of the Common Assessment Framework.

SCIE resource on the topic of integration in children's services, health services, housing, safeguarding adults, social work, and workforce and leadership.

Briefing that examines issues such as the role of health and wellbeing boards and commissioners; the impact of climate change; integration; community and personalisation; leadership and reputation; and risk management and business continuity.

This At a glance briefing discusses the implications of integration for people who use services, practitioners, organisations and researchers. It summarises implications identified in SCIE research briefing 41 Factors that promote and hinder joint and integrated working between health and social care services (Cameron et al, 2012). The research briefing updates a previous systematic review on this topic (Cameron and Lart 2003), and focuses on jointly-organised services for older people and people with mental health problems.

Report that forms part of a wider programme of work being carried out by The King’s Fund on health and wellbeing boards. The programme has supported several local authorities and their health partners to develop their shadow boards. As part of the programme, in late 2011, a survey of 50 local authority areas was conducted, covering all regions of England to find out how they and their health partners are implementing the new boards. Telephone interviews were conducted in September and October 2011 with lead officers identified by local authorities themselves.

Document of the final output of an evaluation of the 16 DH Integrated Care Pilots (ICPs). It provides an account of the evaluation activities conducted, the data collected and the analyses completed.

Based on this it identifies key findings and conclusions about the processes and outcomes seen within the pilots during the evaluation. The evaluation was conducted by a team from RAND Europe and Ernst and Young LLP, with additional statistical analysis provided by the RAND Corporation and The Nuffield Trust.

The purpose of the inquiry has been to consider the issues facing the future of social care, and to make recommendations for consideration by the Government in advance of publication of its White Paper on social care and update on funding.

Although the report focuses particularly on those people aged 65 and older, many of the recommendations are equally relevant to services for younger people who have a disability, and other people who have long-term conditions.

People with long-term physical health conditions – the most frequent users of health care services – commonly experience mental health problems such as depression and anxiety, or dementia in the case of older people. As a result of these co-morbid problems, the prognosis for their long-term condition and the quality of life they experience can both deteriorate markedly. In addition, the costs of providing care to this group of people are increased as a result of less effective self-care and other complicating factors related to poor mental health.