dementia

Enriching opportunities: unlocking potential: searching for the keys

The Enriched Opportunities Programme is an intervention developed by the ExtraCare Charitable Trust and Bradford Dementia group that aimed to improve the well-being and activity of people with dementia living in long-term care. The programme included five key elements: specialist expertise; individualised assessment and case work; activity and occupation; staff training; management and leadership. This research evaluates the impact of the intervention on residents and tenants and on the staff caring for them.

Transforming the quality of dementia care: Consultation on a national dementia strategy

The Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) is pleased to submit the following response to the Department of Health’s consultation on a national dementia strategy. This submission is structured to answer, in order, the questions set by the consultation paper, Transforming the quality of dementia care: Consultation on a national dementia strategy.

The final section covers some areas not directly mentioned in the paper that the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) thinks warrant the government’s consideration in relation to a national dementia strategy.

'Extra care' housing and people with dementia: a scoping review of the literature 1998-2008

This literature review examines the evidence relating to people with dementia living in extra care housing, commissioned by the Housing and Dementia Research Consortium (HDRC) in November 2008. Key aims were to identify recent literature with a focus on evidence relating to the following: design and use of the built environment; facilities, furnishings and equipment; care, support and therapeutic services; organisation and management; outcomes in relation to health, wellbeing, policy and cost.

Advance decisions and advance statements

People who have been diagnosed with dementia, or who are worried that they may develop dementia in the future, are often concerned about how decisions regarding their medical treatment might be made should they lose the ability to decide for themselves. They may fear that life-sustaining or life-prolonging treatments would be provided long after they were able to achieve a level of recovery, length of life or quality of life that the person would at present consider to be acceptable or tolerable.