mental health and mental health care

Direct Payments for those using mental health services

This evidence cluster details 1) what is known about take up of Direct Payments amongst mental health service users and 2) the key factors for successful implementation of Direct Payments for this group. The experiences of service users are reported throughout.

Looked after children and young people: we can and must do better

This publication is intended for everyone who is concerned with looked after children and young people and their families. This includes: elected members, local authority staff, staff in voluntary organisations, private providers, foster carers, health professionals and those involved in developing and improving children’s services.

Mental health in the future: what do you think?

Good mental health is fundamental to the well-being and prosperity of England. In the last decade, greater investment and reforms have transformed mental health care, but now we need to go further.

This easy read booklet is a shorter version of New Horizons: Towards a shared vision for mental health. Which will help improve the services for adults with mental health problems better in the future, and help everyone have better mental health.

Child mental health: key to a healthier society

One in ten of school-aged children have a diagnosed mental problem, with only a quarter of them receiving specialist care recommended in NICE guidelines. The document discusses the scale of the problem and the financial consequences. It then looks at the cost-effectiveness of available treatment and the adequacy of services.

Whose recovery is it anyway?

Recovery is a concept that is gaining prominence in the discourse about mental health. However, there is no consensus about what it means and debate continues about how it can be used to develop person-centred mental health services.

Women's Aid website

Women's Aid is the national domestic violence charity which co-ordinates and supports an England-wide network of over 300 local projects, providing over 500 refuges, helplines, outreach services and advice centres. Our work is built on almost 30 years of campaigning and developing new responses to domestic violence.

Key messages: overview of mental health services

Key messages are presented from a study looking at mental health services provided by the NHS, councils, prisons, the police and the voluntary sector across Scotland for all ages. The study examines the accessibility and availability of mental health services and how much is spent on them.

The report provides an overview of mental health services and is the first in a series of planned reports in this area. The researchers carried out an overview to highlight areas for improvement and to identify priorities for future audit work.

Finding strength from within: report on three local projects looking at mental health and recovery with people from some of the black and minority ethnic communities in Edinburgh

This exploratory community development project gathered the experiences around recovery of people using mental health services who come from some of the black and minority ethnic (BME) communities in Edinburgh. The project involved around 50 people from BME communities. The work with each of the three smaller projects was designed around the circumstances of that service and the ways in which those participants or service users wished to take part. This took place between December 2007 and May 2008.

A missed opportunity?: community sentences and the mental health treatment requirement

The Mental Health Treatment Requirement (MHTR) is one of 12 options (‘requirements’) available to sentencers when constructing a Community Order or a Suspended Sentence Order. The MHTR can be given to an offender with mental health problems who does not require immediate compulsory hospital admission under the Mental Health Act. If they give their consent, the MHTR requires them to receive mental health treatment for a specified period.

Offenders: positive practice guide

The background and policy framework is explained. Offenders' problems gaining access to adequate health and social care services are outlined. Sections then discuss understanding offenders' needs, removing barriers to access, engaging with offenders and training and developing the workforce.