music therapy

An inititative that encourages families to create a playlist of personally meaningful music on an iPod for their loved one. Features stories from families and individuals involved in the programme.

Skills for Care in partnership with Skills for Care and Development (SfCD) and Creative & Cultural Skills (CCS) commissioned Consilium Research and Consultancy to undertake an evidence review and activity mapping study to inform future thinking around the role of arts in the delivery of adult social care and in particular the implications for workforce development:

Evaluation of Sistema Scotland's Big Noise Children‟s Orchestra in the Raploch Estate based in Stirling in 2008. It is an early intervention programme that uses music and participation in an orchestra to foster confidence, teamwork, pride and aspiration in the children.

The Scottish Government commissioned GEN to conduct an evaluation of the process and outcomes achieved by Big Noise. In particular, the study team sought to identify what specific features of Big Noise contribute to the outcomes for children and their families.

The Alzheimer's Society is the UK's leading care and research charity for people with dementia, their families and carers. They produce information and advice sheets to support those affected by dementia.

Public interest in complementary therapies is growing at a significant rate, easily outpacing the research conducted into their safety and effectiveness. People are often attracted to the ‘natural’ and safe image of these therapies, particularly in treating chronic medical conditions, for which conventional treatments are often less than completely effective.

One of a series of reports which forms part of the PROP Practitioner Research Programme, a partnership between the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) at the University of Edinburgh and IRISS that was about health and social care for older people.

The aims of this study are: to systematically identify existing published research on singing, wellbeing and health; to map this research in terms of the forms of singing investigated, designs and methods employed and participants involved: to critically appraise this body of research, and where possible synthesise findings to draw general conclusions about the possible benefits of singing for health. The hypothesis underpinning this review is that singing, and particularly group singing, has a positive impact on personal wellbeing and physical health.