mental health

Being human: a human rights based approach to health and social care in Scotland

Explores human rights in the context of health and social care with intention of stimulating discussion and adding to the existing body of work on this agenda. The report highlights highlight the significant work done by the Independent Living Movement who have led much of this discourse. Human rights have also been a key tenet of the mental health user movement and of both the learning disability and dementia agendas.

Scottish Recovery Network: stories

Recovery stories submitted to the Scottish Recovery Network. They are searchable by topic.

At risk, yet dismissed: the criminal victimisation of people with mental health problems

Research that is a call to action for all services to improve the way we respond to people with mental health problems who have been victims of crime. As one in four of us will experience a mental health problem in any given year, this is an issue that can’t be ignored or dismissed.

Theatre Nemo

Isabel McCue was inspired to set up Theatre Nemo following her son John's eight year battle with mental ill-health. Its mission is to empower people affected by mental ill-health to have better, more fulfilled lives through the creative arts. 

The organisation runs projects in communities, prisons and hospitals.

People with learning disability and mental health, behavioural or forensic problems: the role of in-patient services

Report that sets out the different types of specialist in-patient services that are currently provided, and describes the sort of difficult and challenging circumstances in which such services can be an appropriate intervention for a person with intellectual disability.

These are always serious and challenging problems, where there are major risks to the person themselves and other people, so serious that compulsory treatment under the Mental Health Act is often required. As such, in-patient services can form an essential component of an overall integrated care pathway.

Peer support in mental health care: is it good value for money?

Paper that makes a first attempt at assessing whether peer support provides value for money, looking specifically at whether peer support workers can reduce psychiatric inpatient bed use, either by preventing admissions or by shortening lengths of stay. Because of the very high cost of inpatient care, the savings that result from even small changes in bed use may be sufficient to outweigh the costs of employing peer workers.

The HUG cookbook for action

Resources, advice and ideas for getting involved, offering support and taking action on issues that affect people with mental health issues.

Recovery: a carer's perspective

Paper that examines what recovery means for the families and friends of people with mental health conditions. It suggests ways in which these informal carers can support recovery and looks at how mental health services can give the best possible help to do this.

It also provides information about key resources, including the Triangle of Care and a Wellbeing Recovery Plan for families and friends.