mental health services

This paper outlines the key findings from a study which examined the community care and mental health needs of, and current service provision for, sensory impaired adults in Scotland. The study involved a literature review, a mapping exercise of existing services, and consultation with service planners and providers and with service users and their carers. The research focussed on Deaf, deafened, blind, partially sighted and dual sensory impaired adults.

The Scottish Recovery Indicator (SRI) is a mental health service development tool designed to aid mental health services in making sure their activities are focused on assisting the recovery of people using their services. The SRI is a three-stage process involving planning and preparation, collecting data and drawing up a service development plan.

Dignity in Care is a campaign being run by the Department of Health's website in the UK. It "aims to eliminate tolerance of indignity in health and social care services through raising awareness and inspiring people to take action." The focus of the campaign has mainly been on older people but has now been extended to include people with mental health needs. The website provides further information on the different aspects of the campaign, including relevant publications.

Adult placements are not a new idea. For centuries, vulnerable people haven been cared for by people other than their family in their homes. But it wasn't until the 1970s and early 1980s however, that adult placement schemes, as an organised service, really took off in the UK. The guide has been developed to inform future guidance for local authority commissioners. It identifies relevant national minimum standards and highlights findings and case examples from the practice survey, as well as from the literature where available.

The Scottish Recovery Indicator (SRI) is a tool designed to allow an assessment of how far organisations providing mental health services are meeting their users needs in terms of their rights to equality, social inclusion and support to recover.

This paper summarises the methodology and findings of an SRI pilot project.

The Scottish Recovery Indicator (SRI) is a tool designed to allow an assessment of how far organisations providing mental health services are meeting their users needs in terms of their rights to equality, social inclusion and support to recover.

This paper details the methodology and findings of an SRI pilot project.

This evidence cluster details 1) what is known about take up of Direct Payments amongst mental health service users and 2) the key factors for successful implementation of Direct Payments for this group. The experiences of service users are reported throughout.

The ten essential shared capabilities, developed in consultation with service users and carers together with practitioners, provide in one overarching statement, the essential capabilities required to achieve best practice for education and training of all staff who work in mental health services.

Briefing summarising the key findings of a study of the First Step Trust (FST), a rehabilitation project within Broadmoor Hospital which prepares patients for employment after discharge. The study explored patients and clinicians experiences of FST and looked at how it contributes to successful discharge via the medium secure system.

Paper looking at what vocational rehabilitation is and how it can benefit people with mental health problems, employers and the economy by enabling people with mental health problems to return to and remain in employment. It also considers how vocational rehabilitation can best be delivered and funded.