mental health services

Briefing paper considering the Bradley report on the handling of people with mental health problems and learning disabilities in the criminal justice system in England and the UK Government's response to its recommendations. It concludes that the report's implementation could lead to improvements in the mental health of offenders.

Paper describing some of the key ideas around recovery from mental health problems and looking at their implications for the delivery of mental health services. It aims to stimulate debate about how the recovery approach can be put into practice and what services need to do to make it happen.

This briefing paper examines the provision of mental health care in the criminal justice system. It looks at what has been achieved to date and identifies priorities for further work. It starts with an overview of the prison population, looking at ethnicity, gender, young people and Imprisonment for Public Protection.

The section on mental health care in prison covers: identifying mental health problems; transfer to NHS care; primary mental health care; dual diagnosis; personality disorders. Alternatives to imprisonment including diversion and community sentences are discussed.

Report presenting an historical analysis of the development of race related training and the findings of a survey of race equality training in mental health services in England. It concludes there is a need for a more strategic approach to this training which includes national standards which govern both the nature of training and the selection of training providers.

This research study, commissioned by the Scottish Government Health Directorate, has evaluated the experience and perspectives of those with direct experience of, as well as those working with, the Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 (MHCT Act). A team of independent researchers including 8 mental health service users undertook the study, which lasted 2 years from September 2006.

This study of older people's mental health services assessed available national data and visited specialist mental health trusts. The interview tool covered questions relation to several of the core standards used by the Healthcare Commission to assess trusts' performance. The key findings are reported in four main themes: age discrimination, the quality of inpatient care, the comprehensiveness of services; and working with other organisations (how specialist services worked with primary care, adult social services and acute hospitals).

Report advocating one hundred ways in which those working in the mental health sector can aid the recovery of people with mental health problems. In particular, it focuses on four key tasks, namely developing a positive identity, framing the mental health problem, self managing the mental health problem and developing valued social roles.

Report of a research project which aimed to provide a better understanding of the administrative workload of mental health workers. It sheds some light on the more complex questions about administrative processes and shows where small changes may make processes more effective.

Report reviewing the joint financing and integrated care arrangements between NHS bodies and councils in England with adult social care responsibilities.

Using the examples of learning disability, mental health and older people it discusses how these arrangements are used and makes recommendations to help national and local bodies better understand the options available and how to use them to achieve better outcomes for service users.