mental health problems

This is the fourth in a series of discussion papers designed to help generate debate on how best to promote and support recovery from long-term mental health problems in Scotland. This discussion paper provides an overview of some of the findings of longitudinal mental health outcome studies that have been conducted in the course of the few last decades in different countries and with different patient groups.

This discussion paper from the Scottish Recovery Network concentrates on a developing model of peer support where peer workers are employed and trained as peer workers specifically because of their own lived experience of recovery.

The London Development Centre, with the support of the Mental Health Foundation, set up the Day Services Modernisation Task Group, drawing on expertise from London’s statutory and voluntary providers, and service users. This modernisation toolkit is the main output of the group. London’s day services, like those found in the rest of the country, represent a broad mix of voluntary, statutory, independent and community based service providers.

Report reviewing the services available to older people with mental health problems and making a series of recommendations on how these can be improved.

Paper advocating some first steps in reforming primary care in prisons in England so that the UK Government's policy of 'equivalence', whereby prisoners receive health care in prison which is equivalent to that they would receive outside, can be better achieved.

This report was produced by the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) in response to a request made in July 2007 by the Home Office for the ACMD to review the classification of cannabis in light of the public concern about the potential mental health effects of cannabis use and in particular the use of stronger strains of the drug.

The main focus of this learning object is the early stages of dementia, including the emotional impact of the onset of symptoms and the diagnosis of dementia on the person concerned and those around them. The learning object also considers the importance of community-based support for people with dementia and how social networks can operate in this context. Towards the end of the learning object, you will look at the values and attitudes associated with person-centred care, particularly in relation to caring for and working with people with dementia as their condition progresses.

Report analysing early-life experiences, key issues and trajectories which lead some people into social exclusion and complex needs and using these insights to determine how such people can be better helped.

Although many people experience loneliness at one time or another, it is often overlooked or dismissed. Because society prides itself on self-reliance, loneliness might carry a stigma for people who admit to it. This is both paradoxical and pernicious: if loneliness is transient, it is simply accepted as part of life, but there is a deep dread of being lonely for the long haul.