mental health problems

Parental substance misuse can result in a considerable number of negative effects on the family. However, it is incredibly hard to calculate how many children and other family members might be affected. There is also growing evidence that some children appear to be more resilient than others to the negative impact of parental substance misuse. There is a need to investigate how these general statements relate to parental substance misuse across Scotland, a topic that has been given priority status by the Scottish Executive, and other key organisations.

Report presenting the findings of research which sought to compare adult morbidity, mortality, health behaviours and risk factors in the Glasgow area with those observed in the rest of Scotland and to assess the extent to which any differences can be attributed to the unique socio-economic profile of Glasgow.

Edition of this series which includes a feature on male mental health problems. Peter White talks to Alistair Campbell who experienced a nervous breakdown and still suffers from depression.

This research study, commissioned by the Scottish Government Health Directorate, has evaluated the experience and perspectives of those with direct experience of, as well as those working with, the Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 (MHCT Act). A team of independent researchers including 8 mental health service users undertook the study, which lasted 2 years from September 2006.

Briefing paper presenting the results of secondary data analysis of a series of large British birth cohort studies to illustrate time trends in the emotional and behavioural problems of young people.

Report presenting the findings of a study which carried out a systematic review of the published review literature on the harms and benefits of alcohol consumption for children and young people. The quality of the evidence found is assessed as is its relevance to the UK population. Gaps in the research are also identified.

This review gathered evidence from a variety of sources to examine the current and future contribution of mental health nurses in Scotland to meeting health policy objectives for the care and support of people with mental health problems.

It takes its place as part of a number of initiatives considering the nursing responses to the new health policy agenda in Scotland.

Report advocating one hundred ways in which those working in the mental health sector can aid the recovery of people with mental health problems. In particular, it focuses on four key tasks, namely developing a positive identity, framing the mental health problem, self managing the mental health problem and developing valued social roles.

The Health and Social Care Act 2008 provided for regulations extending direct payments. This consultation, held between August and November 2008, questioned people about revising the existing regulations to allow a greater number of people to take advantage of direct payments.

Rural life may have its attractions, particularly in Scotland’s most beautiful areas, but there may be a price to pay. This article presents the problems of living in remote areas. Rural Scotland tends to have a greater proportion of elderly people in rural areas and so a great incidence of dementia.