mental health problems

Report presenting the findings of a review of the provision of and need for mental health care in five prisons in the West Midlands and making recommendations on how services could be improved.

Briefing paper summarising the findings of a literature review on choice in mental health and learning difficulties carried out in order to help mental health services in England offer their users the same choice concerning their care as people with physical health needs.

Paper describing some of the key ideas around recovery from mental health problems and looking at their implications for the delivery of mental health services. It aims to stimulate debate about how the recovery approach can be put into practice and what services need to do to make it happen.

This report asks why cost-effective analysis is useful in the field, considers it in relation to other evaluations, and discusses depression treatment, intervention for child and adolescent mental health problems, hospital closure and helping decision makers connect with the evidence, ending with recommendations on stakeholder relevance, expanding the evidence base, expanding and adapting existing evidence, methodological challenges and improving linkages and exchange between research and policy-making.

This briefing paper examines the provision of mental health care in the criminal justice system. It looks at what has been achieved to date and identifies priorities for further work. It starts with an overview of the prison population, looking at ethnicity, gender, young people and Imprisonment for Public Protection.

The section on mental health care in prison covers: identifying mental health problems; transfer to NHS care; primary mental health care; dual diagnosis; personality disorders. Alternatives to imprisonment including diversion and community sentences are discussed.

Report presenting an historical analysis of the development of race related training and the findings of a survey of race equality training in mental health services in England. It concludes there is a need for a more strategic approach to this training which includes national standards which govern both the nature of training and the selection of training providers.

Parental substance misuse can result in a considerable number of negative effects on the family. However, it is incredibly hard to calculate how many children and other family members might be affected. There is also growing evidence that some children appear to be more resilient than others to the negative impact of parental substance misuse. There is a need to investigate how these general statements relate to parental substance misuse across Scotland, a topic that has been given priority status by the Scottish Executive, and other key organisations.

Report presenting the findings of research which sought to compare adult morbidity, mortality, health behaviours and risk factors in the Glasgow area with those observed in the rest of Scotland and to assess the extent to which any differences can be attributed to the unique socio-economic profile of Glasgow.

Edition of this series which includes a feature on male mental health problems. Peter White talks to Alistair Campbell who experienced a nervous breakdown and still suffers from depression.

This research study, commissioned by the Scottish Government Health Directorate, has evaluated the experience and perspectives of those with direct experience of, as well as those working with, the Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 (MHCT Act). A team of independent researchers including 8 mental health service users undertook the study, which lasted 2 years from September 2006.