mental health problems

This is one of a series of discussion papers designed to help generate debate on how best to promote and support recovery from long-term mental health problems in Scotland. This paper is based on international learning around what people have identified as important elements in the promotion and support of recovery from long-term mental health problems.

This short report provides an overview of Choosing Health, the Government’s recent public health White Paper, from a public mental health perspective. It aims to identify both the gaps and opportunities in the White Paper and to provide a framework for addressing these.

This exploratory community development project gathered the experiences around recovery of people using mental health services who come from some of the black and minority ethnic (BME) communities in Edinburgh. The project involved around 50 people from BME communities. The work with each of the three smaller projects was designed around the circumstances of that service and the ways in which those participants or service users wished to take part. This took place between December 2007 and May 2008.

Casenote examining what boys call ChildLine about and how this has changed over a period of five years. It compares the number of calls on different subjects, the ages of boys calling across the range of subjects and the links between the issues affecting boys. The views of ChildLine counsellors are also included.

Report of a study which assessed the effectiveness and appropriateness of a pilot mental health in the workplace training initiative. In particular it reports on the immediate impact of the initiative, the intermediate outcomes and makes recommendations for the future based on course content, delivery mechanisms and future roll out.

The Mental Health Treatment Requirement (MHTR) is one of 12 options (‘requirements’) available to sentencers when constructing a Community Order or a Suspended Sentence Order. The MHTR can be given to an offender with mental health problems who does not require immediate compulsory hospital admission under the Mental Health Act. If they give their consent, the MHTR requires them to receive mental health treatment for a specified period.

The background and policy framework is explained. Offenders' problems gaining access to adequate health and social care services are outlined. Sections then discuss understanding offenders' needs, removing barriers to access, engaging with offenders and training and developing the workforce.

This learning object is to introduces Practice Learning Qualification (PLQ) candidates to key concepts and theories relating to communication within the contexts of education, health and social services. It uses the specific context of practice learning within social work education to introduce and explore the themes of verbal, non-verbal and written communication, and communication across diverse situations. In particular it highlights the values and techniques involved in giving and receiving feedback during professional practice learning.