suicide

Self-harm and suicide are complex issues which arouse difficult and distressing emotions both within people who hurt themselves and those who love and care for them. When children hurt or try to kill themselves, adults responsible for them often feel confused, powerless and overwhelmed.

Cross-sectional analysis of self-reported questionnaire data collected from members of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort, England. Respondents (n = 4810) were aged 16–17 years old and have been followed up since birth.

This page contains the findings of systematic reviews undertaken by the EPPI-Centre Health Promotion and Public Health Reviews Reviews Facility This topic is included in the EPPI-Centre knowledge library. The Knowledge Pages facility enables users to search for the key messages within specific subject areas to which EPPI-Centre reviews have contributed.

This report is a scoping exercise to identify whether systematic reviews which might help to identify effective health promotion interventions of relevance to suicide prevention amongst young men aged 19-34 have already been carried out; and if not, what a new review in this area might look like. This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2002 .Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.

Annual report findings for England, Wales, and Scotland, for suicide and homicide. The report covers deaths by suicide for the period January 1997 to December 2008; people convicted of homicide, presented by year of conviction between January 1997 and December 2007; and sudden unexplained death (SUD) in psychiatric in-patients for the period March 1999 to December 2007 (England and Wales only).

Preventing suicide at locations of concern forms an important part of a suicide prevention strategy. While the evidence base is slim, and for most of this guidance is no higher than Grade C according to the hierarchy of evidence set out by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN), there are advantages to taking a consistent approach to reducing the risk of suicide at locations of concern.

The resource database is the Choose Life website's fully searchable portal of knowledge, giving visitors access to training manuals, websites, guidance documents leaflets, manuals and more in the field of suicide and mental health.
The database was developed in direct response to calls by those working in the field to pull together information on the range of materials/resources available.

In 2002, the Scottish Executive launched Choose Life, a ten year national strategy and action plan to prevent suicide in Scotland. The strategy includes a target to reduce suicide by 20% by 2013 and progress towards this target can be viewed in the statistics section of the website.

Choose Life sets out a framework to ensure that action is taken nationally and locally to build skills, develop training, improve knowledge and awareness of 'what works' to prevent suicide, and to encourage partnership working and improved co-ordination between services.

Mind is a leading mental health charity in England and Wales and has produced information on many areas of mental health. This factsheet is for older people, but it is also relevant to their carers, relatives and friends. It explores how older people can maintain good mental health, and gives information on mental distress with an emphasis on the issues that may affect older people. Throughout this factsheet ‘older people’ refers to those aged 65 and over, although many of the issues covered, such as retirement, may be relevant to people under 65.

This is the Samaritans website. Samaritans is available 24 hours a day to provide confidential emotional support for people who are experiencing feelings of distress or despair, including those which may lead to suicide.