mental health

For more story-based resources, see the Storybank.

Website designed to help people affected by mental health problems on their journey of recovery. It invites people to write their stories and experiences – and offers tools and prompts to encourage, inspire and support people to write.

One of a series of reports providing the social services workforce with brief, accessible and practice-oriented summaries of published evidence on key topics.

Developed through a process of rapid appraisal, Insights seek to highlight the practice implications of research evidence and answer the 'So what does this mean in practice?' question for each topic reviewed.

This Insight looks at evidence around assisting those with mental health problems into employment.

An Act of the Scottish Parliament to amend the Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 in various respects; to make provision about mental health disposals in criminal cases; to make provision as to the rights of victims of crime committed by mentally-disordered persons; and for connected purposes.

Briefing that gives an overview of mental health in Scotland. It first discusses mental health within a global and European context, before focussing in more detail on the picture in Scotland. 

It reviews what is currently known regarding the prevalence of mental health conditions, the organisation of mental health services, the current legislative and policy framework that underpins mental health service provision, how these services are regulated and monitored, and finally, the costs and funding of mental health services.

One of the ways in which the Commission monitors individuals’ care and treatment is through the visits programme. It visits individuals in a range of settings throughout Scotland: at home, in hospital or in any other setting such as prisons where care and treatment is being delivered. 

This report details findings from visits between May and September 2013 to 51 women who met the above criteria and makes a number of recommendations in response to these findings.

Throughout November and December 2013, SAMH invited service users and external organisations to participate in a series of discussion groups looking at the interaction of poverty and deprivation and mental health.

This paper forms part of SAMH’s Know Where to Go campaign – a Scotland-wide campaign to tackle the barriers to accessing information, help and support for mental health.

Public participation in planning and implementing health care has become a government mandate in many states. In UK mental health services, this 'user involvement' policy dates back nearly three decades and has now become enshrined in policy. However, an implementation gap in terms of achieving meaningful involvement and influence for service users persists.

Population demographics are changing. Technology continues to develop at a rapid pace. The recovery movement in mental health continues to grow, as does a focus on integration. At the same 
time, demand continues to increase and significant questions are being asked about where future investment in the NHS might come from. Currently, there is a lack of a sustainable and coherent national plan to tackle these issues.