resilience

Mental health, resilience and inequalities

This report aims to demonstrate how poor mental health is a significant cause of wider social and health problems, including: low levels of educational achievement and work productivity; higher levels of physical disease and mortality; violence, relationship breakdown and poor community cohesion. In contrast, good mental health leads to better physical health, healthier lifestyles, improved productivity and educational attainment and lower levels of crime and violence.

GIRFEC: Childhood, Citizenship and Children's Services - Accentuating the Positive: Resilience and desistance approaches - Malcolm Hill

This podcast is taken from the 'GIRFEC: Childhood, Citizenship and Children's Services' conference held in Glasgow on the 24-26 September. Session 2 - Building Better Childhoods, Understanding Contemporary Childhood. Chair Dr Bronwen Cohen, Chief Executive, Children in Scotland. Professor Malcolm Hill from the Glasgow School of Social Work, talk about the resilience and coping behaviour.

Interchange 78 : Transitions in the Lives of Children and Young People : Resilience Factors

This report describes effective strategies, in the fields of health, education and social work, for helping children cope with periods of transition and change through the promotion of resilience. The report draws on an extensive review of the international literature on the promotion of resilience.

Transitions in the lives of children and young people: resilience factors - full report

This report describes effective strategies, in the fields of health, education and social work, for helping children cope with periods of transition and change through the promotion of resilience. The report draws on an extensive review of the international literature on the promotion of resilience.

Insight 6 : Meeting the Needs of Children from Birth to Three : Research Evidence and Implications for Out-of-Home Provision

In 2001 the Scottish Executive Education Department (SEED) commissioned Professor Colwyn Trevarthen and a team of colleagues to review the research evidence on the development of children from birth to three years old, and to consider the implications of that evidence for the provision of care outwith the home.

Have we got our priorities right?: children living with parental substance use

This is the report of a Think Tank on the impact of parental drug and alcohol use. The Think Tank was drawn together by Aberlour Child Care Trust from commissioners, managers, practitioners and researchers working in health, education, social work, criminal justice and drugs and alcohol services across Scotland.

Looking beyond risk. Parental substance misuse: scoping policy

Parental substance misuse can result in a considerable number of negative effects on the family. However, it is incredibly hard to calculate how many children and other family members might be affected. There is also growing evidence that some children appear to be more resilient than others to the negative impact of parental substance misuse. There is a need to investigate how these general statements relate to parental substance misuse across Scotland, a topic that has been given priority status by the Scottish Executive, and other key organisations.

Disabled parents : examining research assumptions

This review seeks to bring a somewhat hidden issue into the light, examining it and considering how the knowledge identified here might influence the future direction of services. Parenting as such has, rightly, gained increasing prominence over the last few years – but the parenting support needs of disabled parents have been largely ignored. This review was developed with two aims in mind. First, to bring together the research literature on disabled parents and, second, to set that research within the context of the policy and practice thinking of its time.

Assessing children in need and their families: practice guidance

This publication is a companion volume to the Guidance on the Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families. It is a significant contribution to a major programme of work led by the Department of Health to provide guidance, practice materials and training resources on assessing children in need and their families.