mental health and mental health care

One of the ways in which the Commission monitors individuals’ care and treatment is through the visits programme. It visits individuals in a range of settings throughout Scotland: at home, in hospital or in any other setting such as prisons where care and treatment is being delivered. 

This report details findings from visits between May and September 2013 to 51 women who met the above criteria and makes a number of recommendations in response to these findings.

Public participation in planning and implementing health care has become a government mandate in many states. In UK mental health services, this 'user involvement' policy dates back nearly three decades and has now become enshrined in policy. However, an implementation gap in terms of achieving meaningful involvement and influence for service users persists.

Population demographics are changing. Technology continues to develop at a rapid pace. The recovery movement in mental health continues to grow, as does a focus on integration. At the same 
time, demand continues to increase and significant questions are being asked about where future investment in the NHS might come from. Currently, there is a lack of a sustainable and coherent national plan to tackle these issues.
 

Resources, advice and ideas for getting involved, offering support and taking action on issues that affect people with mental health issues.

Paper that examines what recovery means for the families and friends of people with mental health conditions. It suggests ways in which these informal carers can support recovery and looks at how mental health services can give the best possible help to do this.

It also provides information about key resources, including the Triangle of Care and a Wellbeing Recovery Plan for families and friends.

In July 2009, the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) published a guide entitled Think child, think parent, think family: a guide to parental mental health and child welfare to help services improve their response to parents with mental health problems and their families. This document and its overall ethos are here referred to as ‘think family’. This is the final evaluation report of the project, documenting the progress made by the sites involved, and making recommendations for future activity.

Report of an independent panel commissioned by Mind to carry out an inquiry into acute and crisis mental health care. It called for evidence, held hearings and visited a range of services.