commissioning

Workbook intended to help local authority and health partners gather data from across the whole system to assist capacity planning and inform local commissioning plans when considering older people's services.

Guide intended to assist councils, working with key strategic partners, to evaluate their performance on the strategic commissioning of care and wider supports for adults, children and young people.

It should also assist councils to evaluate joint commissioning with partner agencies. Its use is not mandatory.

The guide is designed for use in all sectors of social work. It is not prescriptive, and it is for councils to decide how to use the material. However, it contains key questions to ask when evaluating performance on strategic commissioning.

This study of older people's mental health services assessed available national data and visited specialist mental health trusts. The interview tool covered questions relation to several of the core standards used by the Healthcare Commission to assess trusts' performance. The key findings are reported in four main themes: age discrimination, the quality of inpatient care, the comprehensiveness of services; and working with other organisations (how specialist services worked with primary care, adult social services and acute hospitals).

The overall aim of the audit was to review how effectively the public sector commissions social care services.

It examines how well councils and their partners plan, and how councils either procure or deliver, effective social care services. It also assesses the extent to which councils and their partners involve users and carers in developing services to meet their needs, and how they work with providers in the voluntary and private sectors to provide high-quality, sustainable services.

Study that seeks to provide a more theoretically and empirically robust understanding of the dynamic relationship between joint commissioning, services and outcomes, thereby addressing three main questions: