quality assurance

This is the second annual report of the Perth and Kinross Child Protection Committee (CPC) and it sets out the wide range of work which has been undertaken by partner agencies in the past year to evaluate, strengthen and develop services to protect children and young people in Perth and Kinross. Significant achievements include wide ranging campaigns and initiatives to raise awareness about child protection and what to do if you have concerns about the safety of a child.

Guide listing and describing the minimum elements essential for providing high quality sexual assault referral centres for victims of sexual violence and sexual abuse in England, including forensic medical examination.

One of a series of six transforming community service best practice guides for frontline staff and their leaders which aim to help to deliver High Quality Care for all: the Next Sate Review. Each guide has a similar framework, clearly setting out ambitions, taking action to deliver, using best available evidence and demonstrating and measuring achievement. The guides highlight what is considered to be good practice across community services.

Queens Cross Nursery was inspected in April 2009. The centre caters for pre-school children aged three to five years. It is registered for 18 children attending at any one session. The total roll was 14 at the time of the inspection. As a result of the good quality of education provided by the centre no further visits are required.

This is the second report submitted to the Scottish Executive in line with the Guidance for Child Protection Committees published in January 2005. It is a review of key policy and work over the past year.

Document setting out the national minimum standards expected of domiciliary care agencies in England to ensure good quality personal care and support for people while living in their own home in the community.

Guide produced by SWIA to enable local authority social work services to undertake self-evaluations in order to improve service performance and outcomes for those who use services.

This study of older people's mental health services assessed available national data and visited specialist mental health trusts. The interview tool covered questions relation to several of the core standards used by the Healthcare Commission to assess trusts' performance. The key findings are reported in four main themes: age discrimination, the quality of inpatient care, the comprehensiveness of services; and working with other organisations (how specialist services worked with primary care, adult social services and acute hospitals).

This framework focuses on how Scottish Government policies can help support disabled people into sustainable work in mainstream employment.

It recognises that successful implementation must be underpinned by effective partnership working both at a national and local level. Consistency of delivery model, service standards, workforce training and sustainable funding are also crucial to its success.

The framework acknowledges the wider employability context and recognises the UK programmes that are already funded by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP).