good practice

Report of a study which aimed to describe and critically appraise the procedures followed by the National Probation Service to identify and intervene with offenders who have alcohol problems.

Practice papers that summarise recent research on important issues pertinent to residential child care and which draw out possible practice applications.

Website resource that aims to support professionals and agencies working in child protection by developing communities of expertise and sharing practice knowledge across Scotland. Initially funded by Scottish Government, it aims to facilitate access to child care and protection expertise to help agencies deal with issues of neglect and abuse.

Agencies, councils or organisations can approach the MARS for help with specific cases or situations where a child death has occurred or there is concern about possible or substantiated injury or abuse.

One of a series of six transforming community service best practice guides for frontline staff and their leaders which aims to help to deliver High Quality Care for all: the Next Sate Review. Each guide has a similar framework, clearly setting out ambitions, taking action to deliver, using best available evidence and demonstrating and measuring achievement. The guides also highlight what is considered to be good practice across community services.

In 1996 the Scottish Office commissioned a complete revision of the existing guidance manual for Children's Panel members in order to bring it up to date, in particular for the new legislation. The Children (Scotland) Act 1995 was implemented in April 1997 and the Human Rights Act 1998 has since been introduced. Experience of working with the new legislation has brought about best practice guidelines.

Fife Child Protection Committee (CPC) Annual Report 2005 to 2006 and Annual Plan 2006-2007, illustrates the successes, the work underway and plans to build on continuous improvement in child protection.

Certain types of charity are set up to assist or care for those who are particularly vulnerable, perhaps because of their age, physical or mental ability or ill health.

Charity trustees are responsible for ensuring that those benefiting from, or working with, their charity are not harmed in any way through contact with it. They have a legal duty to act prudently and this means that they must take all reasonable steps within their power to ensure that this does not happen.

The purpose of this guide is to offer quick and easy access to information that will aid the implementation of the 2004 Act alongside previous related legislation. The guide explores a number of areas and you will see these listed on the left hand menu. For each topic area the guide includes: key research and policy findings; ideas from practice; links to further information. It also includes related areas of practice not specific to the Act that are useful to its implementation.

The neglect of adolescents involves many aspects of their lives – for example, what happens within their families, particularly as they become young adults; their health and wellbeing; or their education. This means that working with young people who have been neglected inevitably involves more than one agency and the expertise of their staff. There is a need for both agencies and practitioners to work together.