procedures

The report is relevant to all organisations that have reasonability for safeguarding adults at risk in London. Each local partnership in London is asked to adopt this policy and procedures so that there is consistency across London in how adults at risk are safeguarded from abuse. Report published by Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in January 2011. Review date is January 2014.

The Child Protection Committee (CPC) is the lynchpin in implementing strategic plans at local level. In this report the CPC has, in accordance with the National Guidance on Child Protection Committees – Protecting Children and Young People 2005 (Appendix 2), given an account of its work in the previous year, demonstrated the quality of inter-agency co-operation in undertaking the work of the Committee, and presented a business plan for the coming year.

In 1996 the Scottish Office commissioned a complete revision of the existing guidance manual for Children's Panel members in order to bring it up to date, in particular for the new legislation. The Children (Scotland) Act 1995 was implemented in April 1997 and the Human Rights Act 1998 has since been introduced. Experience of working with the new legislation has brought about best practice guidelines.

Fife Child Protection Committee (CPC) Annual Report 2005 to 2006 and Annual Plan 2006-2007, illustrates the successes, the work underway and plans to build on continuous improvement in child protection.

Certain types of charity are set up to assist or care for those who are particularly vulnerable, perhaps because of their age, physical or mental ability or ill health.

Charity trustees are responsible for ensuring that those benefiting from, or working with, their charity are not harmed in any way through contact with it. They have a legal duty to act prudently and this means that they must take all reasonable steps within their power to ensure that this does not happen.

This Communication Strategy sets out the key strategic objectives of the North Ayrshire Child Protection Committee and how they can be implemented. This will ensure effective communication in all aspects of the work and interests of the Child Protection Committee. It is envisaged that this communication Strategy will operate for 3 –5 years, subject to ongoing review.

These Rules permit legal representatives to attend Children's Hearings in certain circumstances. They also specify when the Children's Hearing may consider the appointment of a legal representative, and the circumstances in which an appointment may be made.

They authorise the Principal Reporter to make copies of the relevant documentation available to legal representatives and also specifies groups of persons from whom a legal representative may be appointed.

This document sets out the Scottish Executive’s detailed proposals for a Scottish Human Rights Commission. The Scottish Executive believes that this new body will be a key means to ensure that human rights are protected in Scotland and will also help to develop a ‘culture’ of human rights. By promoting human rights, the Commission will work to ensure that you are more aware of your rights in the future and that you understand how they apply to you and to your family. This consultation paper focuses on the remit, functions and structure of the Commission.

This Annual Report and Business Plan dovetails with the overarching outcomes as detailed in North Ayrshire’s Integrated Children’s Services Plan (2005-2008) and reviews the performance of the Committee in accordance with the Scottish Executive's performance indicators.

These standards were developed to improve the quality of care and service for those in foster care. The standards cover the following activities: recruiting, selecting, approving, training and supporting foster carers; matching children and young people with foster carers; supporting and monitoring foster carers; and the work of agency fostering panels and other approval panels. The standards do not apply to the services provided directly by foster carers themselves.