planning

This is the second part of the report of an action team of experts from local government, the NHS and the voluntary sector to look at how better to integrate children’s services.

Their action plan contains a range of ways in which local authorities, the NHS and the voluntary sector can work together to create a single children’s services system, backed up by a number of good practice examples.

This is the first part of the report of an action team of experts from local government, the NHS and the voluntary sector to look at how better to integrate children’s services.

Their action plan contains a range of ways in which local authorities, the NHS and the voluntary sector can work together to create a single children’s services system, backed up by a number of good practice examples.

This document sets out the rationale for integrated care and its wider context. It provides definitions and concepts of integrated care and its key elements: accessibility, assessment, planning and delivery of care, information sharing, monitoring and evaluation. Evidence is also provided from research literature, focus groups and consultation on the key issues that influence effective practice in integrated care. Key principles and elements of effective practice drawn from the evidence are also explained.

Report that aims to provide information and evidence to support the development of services for young people experiencing problems due to their own problematic drugs and/or substance misuse.

The guide focuses on the needs of drug action teams (DATs) in their role as commissioners of services as well as the direct delivery of services. The report includes definitions of the target client group and their needs; discusses key principles underpinning effective services and explores the key issues to address in delivering services.

Set of three separate papers looking at the development and delivery of personalised services and approaches. The first paper considers what personalisation is and what areas need to be aligned to bring about real user engagement, flexibility and improved outcomes.

The second discusses the role of commissioning in transforming services to meet future needs and the third examines commissioning in greater detail and identifies the issues which arise at an operational level and which might need to be addressed.

First in a series of guides on developing and implementing Integrated Care Pathways (ICPs). While ICPs have been developed within health settings, there is a growing interest in their development across a range of treatment and social care settings to ensure that a co-ordinated, quality service is provided over the full continuum of care. Care pathways are designed to minimise delays, make best use of resources, and maximise quality of care.

This guide examines when and how integrated care pathways can be used to provide better care for people with drug problems.

This is the second report submitted to the Scottish Executive in line with the Guidance for Child Protection Committees published in January 2005. It is a review of key policy and work over the past year.

This is the second in a series of guides on developing and implementing Integrated Care Pathways (ICPs). This guide identifies the steps involved in developing an ICP and examines each process in more detail.

It is aimed at anyone involved in commissioning, planning, developing, delivering and evaluating services for drug users.

Paper intended to provoke discussion on whether and how the recurring barriers to, and enablers of, effective delivery of health improvement pinpointed through evaluations of national initiatives in Scotland over recent years can be appropriately addressed.

Report of a mapping exercise of Scotland's services to young carers undertaken by the Princess Royal Trust for Carers between January and April 2009. The report summarises the key issues thrown up by the identification of the level of services to young carers across each of the local authority areas in Scotland and is intended as a tool to help local authorities and their partners review their service provision to young carers.