media

Poverty in the media: Being seen and getting heard

Public understanding of poverty in the UK is limited. The media can give people with experience of poverty the opportunity to present their views, experiences and opinions, which can help to inform and create a groundswell of public opinion supporting efforts to tackle poverty. This study examines how people with direct experience of poverty in the UK can have a more effective voice in the media. Presentation of their views and experiences through media channels and help to shape and develop public opinion and build support for action to combat poverty.

Methodspace

This website, run by the publishers SAGE, aims to provide support for "researchers, students and university teachers who are interested in learning more about anything to do with research methods". It covers both qualitative and quantitative approaches and tailors the resources available according to the needs of each type of user. The website lists journals, organisations, software, mailing lists, conferences and websites that may be of interest, as well as books.

The Yorkshire Ripper (Radio 4 series: Woman's Hour)

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at how the Yorkshire Ripper's crimes affected the 25 children he left motherless. Almost 30 years ago, a young woman went missing in the early hours of the morning. When they found her body, only yards away from the house where her four young children had been sleeping, the police were yet to realise they had a serial killer in their midst. Wilma McCann was the first victim of Peter Sutcliffe who became known as the Yorkshire Ripper.

Informed Consent in Social Research: A Literature Review

This paper comprises a literature review outlining the current issues and debates relating to informed consent in social research. Focuses primarily on consent in relation to qualitative research comprising ‘traditional’ methods of data collection, such as interviews and observation. It does not does not engage with the many complex ethical issues relating to research using visual methods and new digital technologies nor does it engage with the issues of consent in relation to quantitative research both of which, while important, are beyond the scope of this paper.