decision making

People getting good support to make decisions, is one of the most important aspects of supporting people to live their life in a way that’s right for them. This guide explores supported decision making in light of the Mental Capacity Act (2005), providing ideas and templates to use when supporting people in any decision making process.

This report draws on a systematic review of published evidence to provide lessons on empowerment for policy makers and practitioners. It aims to enable the development of workable activities for empowerment underpinned by a sound evidence base. It focuses on six key mechanisms that facilitate empowerment: asset transfer; citizen governance; electronic participation; participatory budgeting; petitions; redress.

Social Work Intervention is suitable for use once students have appreciated the basic structure and content of the legal rules, which can be applied to a case. Social Work Intervention will raise awareness of: the legal rules that create the framework for social work intervention; the different points of intervention: initial referral and screening, assessment and care planning; and review and re-assessment.

Report presenting the findings from the first phase of a research project set up to investigate how local government can build up more trusting relationships with its citizens. Based on the findings, it identifies a new typology of the trust relationships which the public wants to cultivate with government.

This learning object is one of a set of exercises and activities taken from the book 'Modern Social Work Practice' written by Mark Doel and Steven Shardlow. 'Whanau' is an activity which puts students in touch with the family dimension of social work practice, by looking at decision-making and power in their own families. The activity is inspired by Maori practices in New Zealand, where a radical approach to decision-making in the area of child welfare has put the wider family centre-stage. The approach is called whanau, from the Maori word for family.

This legislation sets out the types of contract that may be made by young persons. The Act defines the age of legal capacity and particular exceptions. The Act provides young people with powers of consent. For example, a young person may consent on his own behalf to any surgical, medical or dental procedure or treatment where, in the opinion of a qualified medical practitioner attending him, he is capable of understanding the nature and possible consequences of the procedure or treatment.

In April 1997 the Social Services Inspectorate undertook an inspection of the child protection services in Cambridgeshire's Social Services Department. This inspection took place at the request of the Parliamentary Under Secretary in the Department of Health following the non-accidental death of Rikki Neave, a child on Cambridgeshire's child protection register. The 1997 inspection identified serious deficiencies in the standard of child protection services in Cambridgeshire.

This report has been written by Save the Children, an international child’s rights organisation, working in Scotland, the UK and in over 60 countries to achieve a better world for children. It discusses the Community Partners Programme, which was set up to explore if active community participation was an effective means of countering children and young people’s social exclusion and assisting them in securing their place as full citizens alongside others.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series consists of a segment on the management of risk in everyday life. As almost every decision a person makes involves weighing up of the odds of success or failure and risk, risk management has become a popular area of sociological debate.

Host Laurie Taylor speaks with delegates at the British Sociology Association's conference in York to find out what aspects of risk they've been discussing. Dr. Iain Wilkinson, Professor Jane Lewis and David Denney join the discussion.

This resource is part of the Open2.Net website, which is the online learning portal from the Open University and the BBC. In order to understand Systems Practice it is first necessary to understand Systems Thinking. Systems Thinking enables you to grasp and manage situations of complexity and uncertainty in which there are no simple answers by looking at connected wholes rather than separate parts.