interprofessional relations

This resource introduces professional identity as a central factor in interprofessional relationships. It invites users to consider the implications of similarity and difference between professionals and how to sustain identity and practice constructively within collaborative relationships.

This resource invites people to explore different dimensions of interprofessional and inter-agency collaboration (IPIAC) and to hear, early on, from those who use care services and carers speaking about their experiences of effective and ineffective collaboration. It will help develop and review understanding of: what is meant by ‘interprofessional and inter-agency collaboration’ (IPIAC); why collaboration has grown in importance; the kinds of evidence that informs collaboration; and key policy and legislation and their timeline.

Scottish Drugs Forum (SDF) is the national non-government drugs policy and information agency working in partnership with others to co-ordinate effective responses to drug use in Scotland. SDF aims to support and represent, at both local and national levels, a wide range of interests, promoting collaborative, evidence-based responses to drug use.

This resource was produced by The Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health which aims to improve the quality of life for people with severe mental health problems by enabling the development of excellent mental health services which are valued by users, carers and professionals. This briefing looks at using opportunities for inter-agency partnership in mental health.

This resource is a web-based community where thousands of health and social care managers connect to share information and develop ideas. Using the Exchange, Viewpoint and Bulletin services, health and social care professionals can work smarter not harder. The exchange promotes service improvement and joined up working.

A study suggesting ways to improve communication between schools and children's services is discussed. The study 'Multi professional communication: making systems work for children' by Georgian Glenny and Caroline Roaf, examined case studies over a seven year period in order to identify the ingredients of successful communication systems.