interagency cooperation

Local safeguarding children boards (LSCBs) have a statutory obligation to communicate and raise awareness of their activity as outlined in Working together to safeguard children: a guide to inter-agency working. This includes ensuring that partner organisations, such as statutory and independent agencies and employers, are aware of safeguarding arrangements. It is also important that members of the local community have an increased understanding of the work that is being carried out to help keep children safe.

This resource focuses particularly on the agency and inter-agency aspects of collaboration by introducing the situation of an older man, Norman Grant and the agencies supporting him.

This resource uses examples drawn from different services and teams to help you think about team working in the context of inter-professional and inter-agency collaboration. It explores some of the conditions that support effective team working and offers opportunities to reflect on contribution as a team member.

This resource introduces professional identity as a central factor in interprofessional relationships. It invites users to consider the implications of similarity and difference between professionals and how to sustain identity and practice constructively within collaborative relationships.

This resource invites people to explore different dimensions of interprofessional and inter-agency collaboration (IPIAC) and to hear, early on, from those who use care services and carers speaking about their experiences of effective and ineffective collaboration. It will help develop and review understanding of: what is meant by ‘interprofessional and inter-agency collaboration’ (IPIAC); why collaboration has grown in importance; the kinds of evidence that informs collaboration; and key policy and legislation and their timeline.

The Child Protection Committee (CPC) is the lynchpin in implementing strategic plans at local level. In this report the CPC has, in accordance with the National Guidance on Child Protection Committees – Protecting Children and Young People 2005 (Appendix 2), given an account of its work in the previous year, demonstrated the quality of inter-agency co-operation in undertaking the work of the Committee, and presented a business plan for the coming year.

This course is a mixture of didactic input and case scenario exercises. It also includes a PowerPoint presentation called 'A Multi Agency Understanding of Child Protection Related to Disability'. The course offers information on the current state of knowledge about the abuse of disabled children and the challenges of their adequate protection. There is then an opportunity for participants to make use of this knowledge using some brief case scenarios. Exercise can last approximately 2.5 hours and is appropriate for groups of 8-25.

Fife Child Protection Committee (CPC) Annual Report 2005 to 2006 and Annual Plan 2006-2007, illustrates the successes, the work underway and plans to build on continuous improvement in child protection.

This report is organised into six chapters and explores a range of issues including the approaches to risk assessment by different professional groups and the progress of validation in respect of the different risk assessment tools in use. Comment is made on risk assessment in action, who carries out risk assessments, how they are carried out and the mechanisms that are in place to ensure a consistent approach to risk assessment within organisations.

This guidance is for police, health, social services, education and all other agencies and professionals that may work with children about whom there are concerns that they are involved in prostitution. It sets out an inter-agency approach, based on local protocols developed within the framework of Working Together to Safeguard Children (Department of Health et al, 1999; National Assembly for Wales, 2000), to address this type of abuse.