internet

Paper commissioned to inform the work of the JRF poverty and ethnicity programme, which aims to understand the underlying reasons for variations in low income and deprivation among different ethnic groups in the UK and the problems caused. It also aims to contribute towards solutions to these problems.

The report explains what social networks are, and their benefits; explores how social networks can help address poverty and be made more accessible; and discusses the impacts of government spending cuts on social networks.

Report that examines the social networking practices of European children, by age, by SNS and by country.

The intention was to inform evidence-based policy regarding child internet safety, identifying the array of practices that occur in order to provide the means for deliberation over future policy initiatives.

The Scottish Government is taking steps which will improve the safety of our children and young people in the online environment. This plan outlines a series of actions which can help meet this aspiration.

It builds on the UK-wide Strategy for Child Internet Safety published in December 2009 and will, once implemented, help to make young people’s approach to the internet more safe and responsible. The plan has been developed in partnership with a dedicated Scottish Stakeholder Group.

Spring issue of the Child Welfare and Technology journal, which explores child welfare and technology, ranging from information communication technology and social media to data integration and gadgets. It addresses the challenges faced and successes celebrated.

This guidance was originally produced in 2005 following the reference in the previous good practice guidance – on chat, instant messaging and web based services – to the fact that some interactive services were “moderated” and others were not.

The importance of moderated services was seen within the context of public concern about online spaces, and in particular chatrooms, where children were potentially at risk from undesirable contact or behaviour from adults in order to “groom” and sexually abuse them.

Report by EU Kids Online on how young people use the internet to communicate with others.

EU Kids Online is funded by the EC Safer Internet Programme (contract SIP-KEP-321803) from 2009-11 to enhance knowledge of children’s and parents’ experiences and practices regarding risky and safer use of the internet and new online technologies.

UK communities find themselves in an increasingly complex world of news mediation. There are more channels of information from around the world that provide more varied sources of topical data and comment than ever before. This paper seeks to chart the impact of changes in global media on low-income groups in the UK and community dynamics. It will explore how their mediated relationship to the local and global world is affected by current trends in media production and consumption.

This paper was commissioned as part of JRF's programme on Globalisation, which explores and promotes awareness of the impacts of globalisation on the UK and focuses on communities and people in poverty.
This paper:
* explains the implications of easier access to global communication;
* surveys the increasing use of the Internet in Britain and how this applies to local and global networks; and
* discusses how individuals and communities can build networks and the challenges this brings.

Digital literacy is an important entitlement for all young people in an increasingly digital culture. It furnishes children and young people with the skills, knowledge and understanding that will help them to take a full and active part in social, cultural, economic, civic and intellectual life now and in the future. This handbook is aimed at educational practitioners and school leaders in both primary and secondary schools who are interested in creative and critical uses of technology in the classroom.

The UK Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) is often asked to contribute to national, European and international discussions and initiatives designed to improve responses to tackling child sexual abuse content on the internet. Wherever beneficial it shares our model and expertise with organisations, companies, governments and agencies around the world to enable others to understand how the UK partnership approach and industry self-regulation is successful in the UK, as well as how the range of services provided have helped to minimise online child sexual abuse content in the UK and beyond.