social services

Child A died of natural causes in October 2007. There was no definite conclusion that abuse or neglect were contributory factors in the death. However, agencies had been involved with A’s family in the period prior to the death. Family circumstances included adverse physical conditions of the home; the failure to attend health appointments; the serious incidents of domestic violence; and the fact that both child A’s parents had been subject to Probation Orders in the period prior to her death.

Publication presenting findings from a range of statistical information to form an overall picture of demand for, supply of and outcomes from the social care workforce.

This briefing provides an overview of what personalisation means for commissioners of social care services. It highlights the main tasks for commissioners delivering personalisation as ensuring the right balance of investment and shaping the market. It also looks at necessary changes to contracting and procurement models, with a shift towards outcomes-focused and person-centred approaches. Two practice examples are included.

Collection of papers focusing on how the role of the professional will develop in the future. It looks at the ways professionalism is changing and evolving in various sectors such as policing, teaching, children's services and the voluntary sector.

IRISS Podcast - Interview with Neil Lunt, a researcher and a lecturer from the University of York which is currently evaluating the initiative taken by Children First and Glasgow School Social Work to develop a practitioner research programme as part of the study he undertook a literature review on practitioner research and social services.

Report presenting and analysing the results of research into the number and skills requirements of migrant workers in the Scottish social services sector.

The second Social Services Labour Market Report brings together a number of key data sources in order to analyse some of the major trends in the Scottish social services labour market (both children & young people and adult services).

This is an updated version of LAC(DH)(2008)2. It gives information about the scope and purpose of funding which the Department of Health introduced last year for all councils with adult social services responsibilities in England to demonstrate how to deliver stroke care for adults in the community.

This report begins with a summary giving the background; key findings; notes on childcare information; advice and assistance - the brokerage service; information about other services, facilities and publications; information on services for disabled children, children with special educational needs and for disabled parents; access to the information service; service delivery; changes made as a result of the extended information duty requirements; and barriers, ending with recommendations and notes on limitations of the research. The main text then pursues these themes in detail.

Adult social care is changing, to put the people who use services at the heart of their own care and support. This requires a different approach from the social care workforce. This At a glance summary presents some ideas about how to successfully change social care services, based on the learning from two previous SCIE publications