childrens services

Report that identifies the most important outcomes children’s centres should be striving for in order to give all children positive early years experiences.

It draws together the best academic evidence, the views of practitioners and parents, and the work that government continues to take forward around the early years. It recognises the value of many of the existing national and local frameworks.

The project adds to the debate by drawing those together and emphasises the need to focus on supporting good parenting and the environment in which parents live and work.

A series of eight practice briefings that have been written to help practitioners and managers put 'Getting it right for every child' into practice in their agencies.

Knowledge review that tells us what works in integrating early years services. It is based on a rapid review of the research literature involving systematic searching, analysis of key data, validated local practice examples and views from people using services and providers.

It summarises the best available evidence that will help service providers to improve services and, ultimately, outcomes for children, young people and their families.

Review to identify the best available evidence on the potential and practical possibilities for improving children’s early learning outcomes through family-based support.

The review seeks to provide a comprehensive overview of the forms of family support that research has identified as significant and the specific learning outcomes they affect. The review also provides a common language and framework for the ongoing C4EO engagement with systems change and practice improvement.

Knowledge review that tells us what works in improving family-based support for children’s learning. It is based on a rapid review of the research literature involving systematic searching, analysis of key data, validated local practice examples and views from both people using services and providers.

It summarises the best available evidence that will help service service providers to improve services and ultimately outcomes for children, young people and their families.

An interactive e-learning resource created to support individuals in achieving outcomes for children.

Report that presents findings from a rapid review of research and national data on the impact of certain background characteristics on outcomes for children in the early years. It seeks to identify the approaches that are most effective in reducing educational disadvantage and promoting positive outcomes.

The review focused on children from birth to seven years of age and included evidence published since 2000. A total of 465 items of literature were identified and considered for inclusion in this review.

Knowledge review that tells us what works in narrowing the gap in outcomes for young children through effective practices in the early years. It is based on a rapid review of the research literature involving systematic searching, analysis of key data, validated local practice examples and the views from both people using services and service providers.

It summarises the best available evidence that will help service providers to improve services and, ultimately, outcomes for children, young people and their families.

Online publication for all those interested in the way children grow up and how they are nurtured. It welcomes contributions from parents, foster parents, residential child care workers in children’s homes, day care workers, social workers, teachers, youth workers, youth mentors, child therapists, social pedadogues, and educateurs, and all people who reflect on their own upbringing.

The journal is electronically archived at the British Library is not an academic publication though academic submissions are welcomed and considered for publication alongside all other submissions.

Report that provides a picture of the employment status of grandparents and other relatives raising children (kinship carers) before and after taking on children, and explores the link between dropping out of the labour market and being a kinship carer.