social networks

Review exploring the evidence relating to the effect of the urban physical environment at neighbourhood level on health and well-being, levels of physical activity and obesity. The aim was to find key studies published since 1990 and synthesise the main messages coming out of them.

Produced on behalf of the London Safeguarding Children Board and in conjunction with the Essex Safeguarding Children Board, the aim of this document is to provide practice guidance to support practitioners working with children and families affected by adults viewing child sexual abuse images – particularly via the Internet; to identify key principles to help inform assessments; to consider some of the practice implications; and to provide an overview of current messages from research and underpinning knowledge.

Report based on evidence from a small-scale survey carried out between April and July 2009 in 35 maintained schools in England. It evaluates the extent to which the schools taught pupils to adopt safe and responsible practices in using new technologies, and how they achieved this. It also assesses the extent and quality of the training the schools provided for their staff. It responds to the report of the Byron Review, Safer children in a digital world.

Four Radio 4 programmes in a series about the health and wellbeing of the seven ages of humanity. These four programmes explore life experiences and issues for people in their sixties and seventies.

The first programme looks at memory loss, the second discusses chronic conditions such as osteo-arthritis and the inability to hear, the third examines retirement, and the final programme looks at how medicine can fix some of the physical problems of old age.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series discusses a recent report by the Economic and Social Research Council which claimed that more Britons live alone than ever before and that loneliness seems to be the one thing people dread. But does living alone necessarily mean we're lonely? Jenni Murray is joined by Helen Wilkinson, a social commentator and founder of Genderquake and Professor Christina Victor, a gerontologist at Reading University.