social networks

Report investigating social networks as a factor in labour market proximity and likelihood of gaining sustained employment. Qualitative methods were used to explore these networks and glean new knowledge of processes underpinning people's participation in employment. The principal aim of the research was to provide employability agencies with a better understanding of how to support and advise clients in a holistic manner.

Paper giving an overview of the main lessons learned from a study of two existing networks and partnerships in health and social services, Managed Clinical Networks and Health Action Zones. The issues raised are examined with a view to establishing the potential for identifying best practice for partnership working.

Report summarising the results of a literature review carried out to gather evidence to enable a better understanding of the risk factors which contribute to health inequalities at community level and inform strategies to tackle this problem.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

This report aims to demonstrate how poor mental health is a significant cause of wider social and health problems, including: low levels of educational achievement and work productivity; higher levels of physical disease and mortality; violence, relationship breakdown and poor community cohesion. In contrast, good mental health leads to better physical health, healthier lifestyles, improved productivity and educational attainment and lower levels of crime and violence.

This study examined parenting during early and middle childhood within different social and cultural groups in Britain, using a ‘parenting score’ derived from different measurements of parents’ relationships with their children. The study was based on parents’ reports of attitudes, feelings and behaviour recorded in response to specific questions relating to parenting. The study also assessed changes in parenting across time.

This report briefly reviews the evidence for the current state of community interaction within England, together with theoretical approaches such as ‘contact theory’ which can inform activities that bring individuals and groups together. The report then draws on the expertise of 28 practitioners from across the country who highlight activities which can be used to stimulate greater interaction and the obstacles and barriers that exist.

Report presenting in detail the reality of being older and housebound in the UK and setting out an agenda for change in which individuals' choices are supported and encouraged by innovative and personalised service delivery.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes two segments. The first looks at research published in 1960 on social change and kinship patterns in Swansea which showed how extended family networks operate. Forty years on, a group of social scientists decided to replicate the 1960 survey and track the changes that have taken place in that time.

Host, Laurie Taylor, is joined by Professor Nickie Charles, one of the co- authors of the new survey to talk about the ways in which family networks persist despite the instability of 21st century life.

This working paper forms part of the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) Economics of Migration project. It looks at how Polish migrants have increasingly used social networks to find employment in the UK. Although this has allowed them to maintain high employment rates it brings a risk that migrants will be "locked in" to low-skilled jobs and less integrated into the wider economy and society. The integration policy agenda is currently focused on long term settlement but many migrants only come to the UK for a short period of time.