social networks

Social change in Scottish fishing communities: a brief literature review and annotated bibliography

The Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) at the University of Edinburgh was commissioned by the Scottish Government Rural and Environment Analytical Services to identify and review literature related to social change in fishing communities in Scotland over the past fifteen years, with particular reference to the role of ‘fishing families’ and of inward and outward migration.

Excluded older people : Social Exclusion Unit interim report

Report presenting the responses to a consultation exercise with older people carried out to discover their views and experiences of service provision in England and identifying policy areas which need to change as a result of these findings.

Resilient nation

Pamphlet looking at the ways in which the UK can build and sustain community resilience in the face of disasters with support from central and local government, relevant agencies, the emergency services and voluntary organisations. It identifies the main principles of community resilience as being engagement, education, empowerment and encouragement.

How can mental health services promote recovery from severe mental illness? (Outline 9)

Paper examining the meaning and process of recovery as described by people with a severe mental illness and identifying a number of factors which support or undermine this. What is known about each factor is summarised as are the implications these have for health and social care practice.

Start with people : how community organisations put citizens in the driving seat

Report of a study which set out to gather evidence regarding the effects of citizen participation and whether involvement in community organisations assists people to connect with wider society. It also explored the processes at work in these organisations which allowed them to engage with citizens effectively.

Social networks and employability

Report investigating social networks as a factor in labour market proximity and likelihood of gaining sustained employment. Qualitative methods were used to explore these networks and glean new knowledge of processes underpinning people's participation in employment. The principal aim of the research was to provide employability agencies with a better understanding of how to support and advise clients in a holistic manner.

Partnerships and networks : past lessons from health and social care (Briefing note 1)

Paper giving an overview of the main lessons learned from a study of two existing networks and partnerships in health and social services, Managed Clinical Networks and Health Action Zones. The issues raised are examined with a view to establishing the potential for identifying best practice for partnership working.

Do psychosocial risk factors influence health in community settings?

Report summarising the results of a literature review carried out to gather evidence to enable a better understanding of the risk factors which contribute to health inequalities at community level and inform strategies to tackle this problem.

Growing up in Scotland (GUS): parenting and the neighbourhood context summary report

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

Mental health, resilience and inequalities

This report aims to demonstrate how poor mental health is a significant cause of wider social and health problems, including: low levels of educational achievement and work productivity; higher levels of physical disease and mortality; violence, relationship breakdown and poor community cohesion. In contrast, good mental health leads to better physical health, healthier lifestyles, improved productivity and educational attainment and lower levels of crime and violence.