memory

Paper discussing the strengths and weaknesses in both short-term and long-term memory in Down syndrome and the implications of these for other aspects of cognitive development and underlying neural pathology.

Communication is a two-way process. Effective communication can improve the quality of life for a person with dementia. However, experts highlight that people with dementia lack the opportunity to talk and express their feelings about the quality of their own life and services they receive.

The third programme in the series looks at the work of British psychologist Sir Frederic Bartlett who discovered that when he asked people to repeat an unfamiliar story they had read, they changed it to fit their existing knowledge, and that it was the revised story which they memorised.

Bartlett's findings led him to propose 'schema' - the cultural and historical contextualisation of memory, which has important implications for eyewitness testimony, false memory syndrome, and even for artificial intelligence. Claudia Hammond investigates the impact of Bartlett's findings.

Mind is a leading mental health charity in England and Wales and has produced information on many areas of mental health. This factsheet is about the different causes of confusion and dementia, and the states of mental and emotional distress that can be mistaken for dementia. It is intended for carers, professionals, students, and anyone with an interest in dementia and related conditions. This factsheet does not give comprehensive information on mental and emotional distress in older people.

The Alzheimer's Society is the UK's leading care and research charity for people with dementia, their families and carers. They produce information and advice sheets to support those affected by dementia. The Alzheimer’s Society receives around 1,000 enquiries a year about the law relating to dementia. This information sheet gives answers to some of the most common types of questions.

The Alzheimer's Society is the UK's leading care and research charity for people with dementia, their families and carers. They produce information and advice sheets to support those affected by dementia. This information sheet aims to answer questions of those who have been diagnosed with dementia.

This resource examines the human mind. Presenter Robert Winston explores all aspects of the human mind - from how we learn, to how we're able to recognise faces and what makes one person 'click' with another. There are three programmes in the series which are available on the Open2.net website, which is the online learning portal from the Open University and the BBC.

Four Radio 4 programmes in a series about the health and wellbeing of the seven ages of humanity. These four programmes explore life experiences and issues for people in their sixties and seventies.

The first programme looks at memory loss, the second discusses chronic conditions such as osteo-arthritis and the inability to hear, the third examines retirement, and the final programme looks at how medicine can fix some of the physical problems of old age.

This booklet, produced by the Mental Health Foundation, is to help children and young people understand dementia. It explains how people with dementia behave and feel, it also aims to provide young people with information about the illness and how to cope with knowing someone who was dementia. There are a number of exercises in the booklet which make it ideal for use in the classroom, as part of a PSHE lesson.