quality of life

This document details the additional design criteria, social activities, care and support services to be provided in very sheltered housing schemes offering accommodation to older people living with dementia. Issues covered include personal care, medication, staffing, quality of life, involvement with the community, and building design.

'Living Well with Dementia' sets out the government’s strategy for helping people with dementia and their carers over the next five years. Its aim is to ensure that significant improvements are made to dementia services across three key areas: awareness and understanding; earlier diagnosis and intervention; and quality of care. This briefing summarises the key points of the strategy, covering in greater depth elements which are relevant to the housing sector.

This short report provides an overview of Choosing Health, the Government’s recent public health White Paper, from a public mental health perspective. It aims to identify both the gaps and opportunities in the White Paper and to provide a framework for addressing these.

This exploratory community development project gathered the experiences around recovery of people using mental health services who come from some of the black and minority ethnic (BME) communities in Edinburgh. The project involved around 50 people from BME communities. The work with each of the three smaller projects was designed around the circumstances of that service and the ways in which those participants or service users wished to take part. This took place between December 2007 and May 2008.

The well-being of older people is an important issue for policy across health, housing and social care, and local authorities are increasingly considering extra care as a way of replacing older models of residential care provision and addressing low demand for traditional forms of sheltered housing. The researchers interviewed residents and managers from six extra care housing schemes in England to explore their experiences.

The author reports on research which aimed to examine the impact on carers of people receiving individual budgets and the outcomes for carers of this new approach.

While there are many ways in which personal budgets can be provided, one of the main ways is through a direct payment.

This research is the first to examine the impact on carers of people receiving IBs and the outcomes for carers of this new approach.

Report presenting the findings of research which sought to compare adult morbidity, mortality, health behaviours and risk factors in the Glasgow area with those observed in the rest of Scotland and to assess the extent to which any differences can be attributed to the unique socio-economic profile of Glasgow.

One of a series of reports which forms part of the PROP Practitioner Research Programme, a partnership between the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) at the University of Edinburgh and IRISS that was about health and social care for older people.