quality of life

Understanding society: findings 2012

Second annual publication of findings from Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study. 'Understanding society' is a major social science investment in longitudinal studies with potentially huge long-term implications for social science and other research and for the understanding of the UK in the early twenty-first century. It provides valuable new evidence about the people of the UK, their lives, experiences, behaviours and beliefs, and enables an unprecedented understanding of diversity within the population.

'Would you have sandwiches for your tea every night?': older people's views of social care in Northern Ireland

Research produced as a result of a project which aimed to consult directly with older people to ascertain their views on all aspects of social care and report on the main findings.

SRC worked in partnership with Age NI staff and peer facilitators to recruit for and run three focus groups across NI. The focus groups were held in Belfast, Cookstown and Irvinestown. In total, twenty four older people attended the focus groups – two thirds male and one third female.

Quest for quality: an inquiry into the quality of healthcare support for older people in care homes - a call for leadership, partnership and improvement

Report that describes current NHS support for care homes. It tells a story of unmet need, unacceptable variation and often poor quality of care provided by the NHS to the estimated 400,000 older people resident in UK care homes.

Facing dementia

A booklet for those who are either worried about dementia or who have been diagnosed. It provides reassurance and suggests practical steps to improve or maintain dignity and the quality of life as far as possible.

Child wellbeing and child poverty: where the UK stands in the European table

Child wellbeing and child poverty:where the UK stands in the European table, is a briefing paper of research by a York University team for the Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) published in April 2009. This league table of young people's wellbeing places the United Kingdom 24th out of 29 countries measured across seven areas: health, education, housing, material resources, relationships, risk, and how young people feel about their lives. The data was mostly drawn from 2006 and does not reflect changes as a result of government programmes since that time.

Promoting social well-being in extra care housing

The well-being of older people is an important issue for policy across health, housing and social care, and local authorities are increasingly considering extra care as a way of replacing older models of residential care provision and addressing low demand for traditional forms of sheltered housing. The researchers interviewed residents and managers from six extra care housing schemes in England to explore their experiences.

Individual budget users and carers

The author reports on research which aimed to examine the impact on carers of people receiving individual budgets and the outcomes for carers of this new approach.

While there are many ways in which personal budgets can be provided, one of the main ways is through a direct payment.

This research is the first to examine the impact on carers of people receiving IBs and the outcomes for carers of this new approach.

Enriching opportunities: unlocking potential: searching for the keys

The Enriched Opportunities Programme is an intervention developed by the ExtraCare Charitable Trust and Bradford Dementia group that aimed to improve the well-being and activity of people with dementia living in long-term care. The programme included five key elements: specialist expertise; individualised assessment and case work; activity and occupation; staff training; management and leadership. This research evaluates the impact of the intervention on residents and tenants and on the staff caring for them.

How can people with dementia be assisted to maintain independence and quality of life? (Outline 13)

Paper considering ways in which health and social services can re-shape their policies and practices in order to help dementia sufferers and their carers maintain as independent a life as possible given that cases of dementia are set to increase in the future.