life style

Second annual publication of findings from Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study. 'Understanding society' is a major social science investment in longitudinal studies with potentially huge long-term implications for social science and other research and for the understanding of the UK in the early twenty-first century. It provides valuable new evidence about the people of the UK, their lives, experiences, behaviours and beliefs, and enables an unprecedented understanding of diversity within the population.

This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2006. Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.

Life checks have been proposed by the English Department of Health as a personalised service providing support and advice at key stages throughout the lifespan to help people to maintain and improve their health. For young people, the proposed key stage for a life check is the transition between primary and secondary school sat ages 11 to 12 years. This review was a scoping exercise to identify the size and scope of the available research evidence relevant to the life check proposal for young people. This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2007.

Report that provides a compelling evidence base for the first time about older lesbian, gay and bisexual people in this country.

It also provides practical recommendations for a range of agencies about how to improve things. Britain’s 3.7 million gay people contribute £40 billion annually to our public services.

The Alzheimer's Society is the UK's leading care and research charity for people with dementia, their families and carers. They produce information and advice sheets to support those affected by dementia. This information sheet explains what is known about the risks associated with different types of dementia and gives some advice on how people can reduce their risk.

The Enriched Opportunities Programme is an intervention developed by the ExtraCare Charitable Trust and Bradford Dementia group that aimed to improve the well-being and activity of people with dementia living in long-term care. The programme included five key elements: specialist expertise; individualised assessment and case work; activity and occupation; staff training; management and leadership. This research evaluates the impact of the intervention on residents and tenants and on the staff caring for them.

In June 2008, the Child Poverty Unit held an event entitled ’Ending Child Poverty: “Thinking 2020”’ at which around 100 stakeholders from across lobby organisations, academic institutions, devolved administrations and local and central Government attended. The event was designed to begin a discussion with stakeholders on the vision for a UK free of child poverty by 2020, and the route by which that could be achieved.

Presents the findings from a research study which identifies and explores the changing support needs of people with sight loss from the clinical, visual function and quality of life perspectives. Data were derived from biographical narrative interviews and a visual function questionnaire with people with sight loss, and semi-structured interviews with professionals involved in the delivery of specialist visual impairment services.

This report presents the findings from an exploratory qualitative study that centres on a key Department for Work and Pensions client group that until now has not been extensively researched in terms of its interaction with benefit and employment services and the labour market. It focuses on a cohort of 40 (male) ex-prisoners who were tracked over a six-month period following their release from prison.

A booklet for those who are either worried about dementia or who have been diagnosed. It provides reassurance and suggests practical steps to improve or maintain dignity and the quality of life as far as possible.