communication skills

This resource is an introduction to the differences between adult and children’s communication. This is a mixture of small group discussion and tutor-led information giving, supported by handouts.

This resource looks at the benefits that are gained from the relationships that are built within social work. Using the voices of service users, carers and workers will be possible to understand how the relationships that were created helped them to deal with the difficulties they faced. This resource will allow the understanding of the importance of relationships in social work and the personal attributes needed to form and maintain positive working relationships.

This short training scenario was originally used in the context of introductory child protection training. It gives brief information from which participants are asked to identify what they are concerned about and what they would do next in the case of Irene who has written a story at school which raises concerns.

The Alzheimer's Society is the UK's leading care and research charity for people with dementia, their families and carers. They produce information and advice sheets to support those affected by dementia. The Alzheimer’s Society receives around 1,000 enquiries a year about the law relating to dementia. This information sheet gives answers to some of the most common types of questions.

This exercise is designed to prompt participants to ‘surface’ the beliefs and values that underlie their reactions to the situations that children are in. This exercise is usually carried out with a large group split into smaller groups of 4 – 5 people. It lasts approximately 90 minutes.

This report describes a project that sought to analyse and evaluate a particular academic course unit entitled 'Skills development and theorising practice', which ran in 2002-2003 as part of the old Diploma in Social Work. The aim was to gain a greater understanding of how student development could be facilitated in these key areas of practice.

This online guide suggests some simple steps that can be taken to make children safer, and to understand better how and why people sexually abuse children and how we can stop them.

It includes information on: who are the abusers?, how do abusers control children?, how do abusers keep children from telling?, what makes children vulnerable? and leaving children in the care of others; hints and tips; talking with your children; children out and about; and what to do if you suspect abuse.

The aim of this workshop is to dispel the fears of people who are relatively new to child protection issues, and those who feel it is a muddy area of legislation and uncomfortable procedures for themselves and the children and young people they work with.

The beauty of this workshop is it can be used for introduction to child protection issues or to update existing knowledge or beliefs. The exercise lasts between 1 to 3 hours and is suitable for groups of 3 to 20.

Good communication, both oral and written, is at the heart of best practice in social work. Communication skills are essential for establishing effective and respectful relationships with service users, and are also essential for assessments, decision making and joint working with colleagues and other professionals.

This short training scenario was originally used in the context of introductory child protection training. It gives brief information from which participants are asked to identify what they are concerned about and what they would do next. Sally uses drugs and is pregnant. She has a history of local authority care.