marriage

What's in a name? Is there a case for equal marriage

Report that seeks to adopt an evidence-based analysis of the arguments around marriage equality to consider whether there is a compelling argument to reform the law.

It pursues a reasoned analysis of the equal marriage concept and its practical implications and evaluate the arguments on both sides of the divide. It also explores the experience of other countries where equal marriage is already a reality.

Cohabitation, marriage, relationship stability and child outcomes: an update

Study based on data from the Millennium Cohort Study (MCS) and the British Cohort Study (BCS). The MCS is a longitudinal study of children which initially sampled almost 19,000 new births across the UK in the early 2000s, with follow-ups at 9 months, 3 years, 5 years and 7 years. The BCS is a longitudinal study of all individuals born in Great Britain in a particular week in April 1970, which has surveyed them at various points throughout their lives, the latest at age 38 in 2008.

Consultation on "Forced Marriage: A Civil Remedy?": Analysis of Responses

This report presents the findings of a consultation on forced marriage, through which the Scottish Government sought views on whether civil legislation on forced marriage should be introduced in Scotland.

Consultation on "Forced Marriage: a Civil Remedy?" Analysis of Responses RF 3/2009

This is a summary of the findings of a consultation on forced marriage, through which the Scottish Government sought views on whether civil legislation on forced marriage should be introduced in Scotland.

Marriage (Scotland) Act 2002

The present law of marriage in Scotland is governed by the Marriage (Scotland) Act 1977. The current position is that there is no restriction on places where religious marriages may be solemnised but a civil (non-religious) marriage may be solemnised only within a registration office, unless there are exceptional circumstances (i.e. where an individual is unable to attend a registration office as a result of serious illness or serious bodily injury and there is a good reason why the marriage cannot be delayed.

Impact of family breakdown on children's well-being: evidence review

This review investigates the impact of parental separation and divorce on children’s well-being and development. The review incorporates evidence concerning family breakdown, and its consequences, in the context of understandings of ‘the family’, ‘breakdown’ and the ‘well-being’ of children and young people, and includes research relating to both married and cohabiting parents. ‘Well-being’ is defined as incorporating children’s mental, emotional and physical health.

Families in Britain : the impact of changing family structures and what the public think

Report tracing the changing nature of the family and what that means for parents, children and society with a view to stimulating debate on family policy. It explores the changing face of families in Britain and the impact of these changes on society, public opinion and the role of government. It also highlights the opportunities for policymakers created by the changing demographic, social and attitudinal terrain.

Childhood mental health and life chances in post-war Britain : insights from three national birth cohort studies : executive summary

Report summarising the main findings of a research project which analysed the long-term consequences of mental health problems which arise in childhood and adolescence using longitudinal data.

Breakthrough Britain: ending the costs of social breakdown

This report from the Social Justice Policy Group, chaired by Iain Duncan Smith, identifies five 'pathways' to poverty and makes proposals for tackling them. These pathways are: educational failure, family breakdown, economic dependence, indebtedness and addictions. A sixth section considers how the third sector might be better supported to help people escape poverty.