ageing

This report notes that there is an incomplete picture of family life in Britain. The scale of the contribution that the UK's 14 million grandparents are making is not fully known. This interim report uses new British Social Attitudes (BSA) survey data to begin to build a more comprehensive picture of Britain's grandparent population; looking at how it has changed over the last decade, and what financial implications becoming a grandparent might involve.

This report explores the changing lives of older people and shows how resources are used to manage change and maintain stability. An ageing population continues to be of policy concern, in relation to meeting the needs of older people now, and for future welfare provision. This research explores how older people plan, use and value the different resources available to them. Resources are broadly defined, to explore the relative value of different structural, social and individual resources and how they interlink.

Document putting forward the case for a public debate about the long term future of the care and support system in England as part of the UK Government's desire to engage with the public and key stakeholders about how the existing system can meet the challenges of the future.

Paper discussing the implications for public services of an increasingly ageing society and seeking views from the general public on what they think is important for a good quality of life in later life.

This report draws on a literature review and consultation to examine the current performance of care and support in protecting and promoting human rights and equality. The report aims to influence thinking on the future of care and support in England and it sets out the actions the Equality and Human Rights Commission will take to help make its vision for care and support a reality.

Podcast of a talk given by Ken Laidlaw, consultant clinical psychologist, NHS Lothian at Edinburgh City Chambers, 29/01/2009. He discusses findings from research about ageing across the world.

More than 40% of care homes in Scotland need to improve the support they offer people with life-limiting illnesses and those who require palliative and end of life care, according to a new report from Scotland’s care watchdog.

This report reflects the findings of 1036 inspections and three investigations carried out by the Care Commission at care homes for older people between April 2007 and March 2008.

The main focus of this learning object is depression amongst older people. The learning object begins by highlighting some of the problems with defining and diagnosing 'depression' and then goes on to discuss the estimated numbers of older people that are thought to suffer from the condition. Issues that make people more or less vulnerable to developing depression in later life are also examined. Finally, effective treatments for depression and explanations for why it so often remains unrecognised in older people is discussed.

In this learning object you are introduced to the importance of seeing later life as one phase of an entire course of life from birth to death shaped by earlier life stages and experiences. Meaning and identity are important to mental health in later life and require that we can connect past, present and future in our lives. A highly influential theory of the life course which embodies these themes is the psychosocial theory of Erik Erikson, which you will consider in Section 2.

Document containing a series of essays which examine the challenges facing 'Maggie's children', those born between 1980 and 1995, and their prospects for the later stages of their lives in 50 years time. Topics discussed include pensions, health and social care and education and recommendations are made as to how these challenges can be met.