intergenerational relationships

Research that aims to explore the importance of couple, family and social relationships in the context of ageing and to understand how baby boomers’ relationships may be put under strain as they approach retirement and in older age.

Organisation that provides information, delivers support and encourages involvement to benefit all of Scotland’s generations, by working, learning, volunteering and living together.

A consortium research centre based at The University of Edinburgh. CRFR produces, stimulates and disseminates social research on families and relationships across the lifecourse.

Research that uses the vast developments in the measurement of the intergenerational earnings mobility correlation over the past twenty years to explore the issues surrounding the measurement of the intergenerational correlation of worklessness.

This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2011.Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.

Report looking at who the members of the baby boomer generation are, what is known about their values and attitudes and how the challenges for them of economic and community participation, self-fulfilment, quality of life and family and intergenerational obligation might be met through a more positive and proactive approach to the issues and the potential for innovation.

Document laying out the Scottish Executive's strategy for responding to and planning for an ageing population in Scotland. The strategy covers topics such as the role of public services, increased opportunities for older people, better intergenerational relationships, improving health and providing lifelong learning opportunities.

VotingAge is a campaign by older people to promote the needs and concerns of older people to political parties. This document contains the findings from regional consultation events and lays out the main areas of concern for older people and the changes they believe politicians should make to improve the quality of life for older people.

The Mellow Babies intervention was designed to develop close attunement between the mother and the child using a combination of baby-massage, interaction coaching and infant focused speech.

A waiting-list-controlled evaluation of the Mellow Babies intervention is described.

The objectives were to measure change in maternal depressive symptoms and the quality of interaction between mothers and babies. Recruitment was less than had been hoped, but for those mothers who completed the group, feedback from referrers and participants was positive.