attitudes

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish. Its aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties. Focusing initially on a cohort of 5,217 children aged 0-1 years old and a cohort of 2,859 children aged 2-3 years old, the first wave of fieldwork began in April 2005.

In June 2004, Scottish Ministers initiated the first fundamental review of Social Work since the Social Work (Scotland) Act in 1968.

To inform the work of the review, the Scottish Executive Education Department ( SEED) commissioned MORI Scotland to conduct a programme of public opinion research. The over-arching aim of the programme of public opinion research described in this report was to provide the 21 st Century Social Work Review Group with an understanding of public knowledge of, and attitudes towards, social workers and social work services.

In January 2005, the Social Work Services Policy Division of the Scottish Executive commissioned the British Market Research Bureau (BMRB) to undertake research to understand why social work students are undertaking the new social work degree and the postgraduate degree. This resource outlines the key findings of this research.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children. This document is one of a series that summarises key findings from the second sweep of the survey which was launched in April 2006. At the second sweep, interviews were successfully completed with 4,512 respondents from the birth cohort and 2,500 from the child cohort.

Report that explores whether different groups in society experience different levels of social capital. Does where you live affect the strength of your social networks? Are older or younger people more likely to benefit from having strong links with other people in their community? And are people who are already socio-economically disadvantaged further disadvantaged by having lower levels of social capital and therefore fewer resources to draw upon?

It draws on data from the Scottish Social Attitudes survey (SSA) 2009 and the Scottish Household survey (SHS) 2010.