attitudes

Research findings which examine the use of childcare for both the baby and toddler cohorts of the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) longitudinal research project, and how cost, type, mix of formal and informal provision, duration and childcare preferences vary according to parents’ socio-economic circumstances.

Differences in attitudes towards employment and childcare are also explored.

'Living Well with Dementia' sets out the government’s strategy for helping people with dementia and their carers over the next five years. Its aim is to ensure that significant improvements are made to dementia services across three key areas: awareness and understanding; earlier diagnosis and intervention; and quality of care. This briefing summarises the key points of the strategy, covering in greater depth elements which are relevant to the housing sector.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

This resource - Getting it right together on learning disabilities, has been written for all pre-registration nursing students in Scotland. It comprises five units of study that will support something in the order of 12 to 15 hours of directed and, or, facilitated learning on a range of issues that relate to learning disabilities. Unit 3 looks at the history of learning disabilities.

Report that draws on data from the first sweep of the Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) study to examine the extent to which parents with young children have access to, and draw upon, informal sources of support with parenting. That is, support, information and advice which is sought from and provided by family members - including spouses, partners, parents’ siblings and the child’s grandparents - friends, and other parents.

In late summer of 2008, Young Scot was commissioned by the Scottish Government to seek the views of young people from across Scotland on what they thought about the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child's Concluding Observations relating to the implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Right of the Child (UNCRC). The consultation explored the levels of awareness children and young people had regarding children's rights and their thoughts on which rights were most important for them, and for Scotland as a whole, to take action on.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Funded by the Scottish Executive Education Department, its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

Document setting out the Scottish Government's strategic approach to tackling alcohol misuse in Scotland.

The measures proposed include specific legislative action intended to bring about short term change and more general measures aimed at effecting cultural change in the long term.

Brief power-point presentation that gives an overview of important points of historical reference in our understanding of and approach to children and their treatment.

It concludes with reference to two important current legislative and policy contexts – the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and The Children (Scotland) Act 1995.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish. Its aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties. Focusing initially on a cohort of 5,217 children aged 0-1 years old and a cohort of 2,859 children aged 2-3 years old, the first wave of fieldwork began in April 2005.