attitudes

This report uses data from the Growing up in Scotland (GUS) study to explore the contribution of specific measures of advantage and disadvantage in relation to a number of specific health related behaviours for parent and child and, in doing so, seeks to identify the characteristics of more vulnerable and more resilient families. Findings are based on the first sweep of GUS, which involved interviews with the main carers of 5,217 children aged 0-1 years old and 2,859 children aged 2-3 years old, carried out between April 2005 and March 2006.

Research that highlight's some important issues surrounding the role alcohol plays in society, perceptions of what constitutes problem drinking and awareness of and attitudes towards services. It also explores perceptions of 'what works'. A problem for policy-makers is the questionable compatibility of strategies to, on the one hand, stress that ‘getting legless’ is not normal or socially acceptable, while on the other, trying to reduce stigmatisation associated with alcohol problems so as to encourage people to seek help through services.

This report presents the findings of a survey of the views and perceptions of 2,500 young people held in prison. Information is included on young people’s perceptions of their conditions and treatment, from their transfer to the establishment to their preparation for release. The results for young women, young men, and those from black and minority ethnic backgrounds are discussed separately.

The elderly are often described as a problem group. In this video, Michele Hanson visits Age Concern's Great Croft Resource Centre in Camden to find out how people feel about this.

Parents’ expectations and experiences of pregnancy, birth and the first few months of parenting are presented as part of the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

Report of a study which aimed to build on current understanding of the motivators and barriers to young people taking part in positive activities and provide more detailed data on which channels and messages are most effective in driving demand and encouraging young people to participate.

This report presents the findings from a survey of over 1700 young people aged between eight and 17 years old. The survey explored young people's perceptions and opinions on gun and knife crime; the reasons why some young people carry guns and knives; solutions to the problem; perceptions of the local area, safety and relationships with authority figures; the demographic factors that drive differences between groups.

Paper highlighting the difficulties and barriers faced by ex-offenders when seeking employment and documenting the social and economic consequences of this situation, both for the offender and wider society. To help remove these barriers it argues for measures such as a network for employers to share their experiences of employing ex-offenders.

This reports on the Disability and Carers (DCS) Customer Service Survey 2008. Results showed that overall satisfaction with the DCS continues to be high and that there have been some signs of improvement since the previous year. The report suggests a number of aspects of the service that should be focused on.

This feasibility study sought to examine how best to conceptualise and evaluate how decision-making in children’s lives takes due account of their views, with particular attention to processes related to Part I of the Children (Scotland) Act 1995 and the implications for compliance with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC).