parental attitudes

The Scottish Schools (Parental Involvement) Act 2006 aimed to improve the way that schools engaged with parents, both individually through parental involvement and collectively through Parent Councils. This report presents the findings of a representative survey of 1,000 parents in Scotland to see whether the new legislation was making a difference by increasing levels of parental involvement and representation.

This report summarises findings from sweep 2 of the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS), a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children.

It is focussed on children’s experiences of pre-school education. This document is one of a series that summarise key findings from the second sweep of the survey which was launched in April 2006. At the second sweep, interviews were successfully completed with 4,512 respondents from the birth cohort and 2,500 from the child cohort.

Between February and June 2001, the Scottish Executive Health Department undertook a consultation exercise to inform the development of its Plan for Action on alcohol problems. As part of this exercise, various pieces of research were commissioned to explore issues around alcohol misuse in Scottish society.

This paper presents the main findings of a study which obtained the views of problem drinkers,current and former alcohol service users and their families and friends.

Study examining the level of parental involvement in middle childhood and concluding that children in middle childhood are more likely to have behaviour problems if they watch more than three hours of TV a day and have low parental involvement.

Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) is a major longitudinal study launched in 2005 with the aim of tracking a group of children and their families from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Funded by the Scottish Government its main aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is a longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Funded by the Scottish Executive Education Department, its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

In 2009, the Department for Children, Schools and Families commissioned GfK NOP to conduct research to investigate young people and alcohol. Specifically, the research was designed to better understand parents’ and young people’s attitudes and behaviour towards alcohol and alcohol consumption. The research was also designed to investigate how children’s behaviour may be influenced by their parent’s attitudes and behaviour towards alcohol.

Research findings which examine the use of childcare for both the baby and toddler cohorts of the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) longitudinal research project, and how cost, type, mix of formal and informal provision, duration and childcare preferences vary according to parents’ socio-economic circumstances.

Differences in attitudes towards employment and childcare are also explored.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

Report that draws on data from the first sweep of the Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) study to examine the extent to which parents with young children have access to, and draw upon, informal sources of support with parenting. That is, support, information and advice which is sought from and provided by family members - including spouses, partners, parents’ siblings and the child’s grandparents - friends, and other parents.