living and life events

Second annual publication of findings from Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study. 'Understanding society' is a major social science investment in longitudinal studies with potentially huge long-term implications for social science and other research and for the understanding of the UK in the early twenty-first century. It provides valuable new evidence about the people of the UK, their lives, experiences, behaviours and beliefs, and enables an unprecedented understanding of diversity within the population.

Report that presents a summary of the latest information collected from the full wave one of the Life Opportunities Survey (LOS), for which fieldwork was conducted across Great Britain between June 2009 and March 2011.

A report based on the interim results - year one of the first wave of fieldwork - was published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) in December 2010. The findings in this report replace the findings presented in the interim report.

Paper that addresses the question of how much of adult life satisfaction is predicted by childhood traits, parental characteristics and family socioeconomic status.

The Enriched Opportunities Programme is an intervention developed by the ExtraCare Charitable Trust and Bradford Dementia group that aimed to improve the well-being and activity of people with dementia living in long-term care.

The programme included five key elements: specialist expertise; individualised assessment and case work; activity and occupation; staff training; management and leadership. This research evaluates the impact of the intervention on residents and tenants and on the staff caring for them.

Public support is needed to ensure that the government and other organisations take action to tackle poverty in the UK. The perception of poverty is often misguided, with people believing that it is a result of laziness, or an inevitable part of modern life.

The aim of this research is to identify ways of changing such perceptions and building public support for addressing the problem.

A literature review carried out by the University of Edinburgh in August 2007 which found that most young people move on from being looked after at 16 or 17 years; this tends to be an abrupt transition which has been referred to as 'accelerated and compressed', further impacting on other aspects of their lives such as education, relationships and health and well-being.

In June 2008, the Child Poverty Unit held an event entitled ’Ending Child Poverty: “Thinking 2020”’ at which around 100 stakeholders from across lobby organisations, academic institutions, devolved administrations and local and central Government attended. The event was designed to begin a discussion with stakeholders on the vision for a UK free of child poverty by 2020, and the route by which that could be achieved.

Presents the findings from a research study which identifies and explores the changing support needs of people with sight loss from the clinical, visual function and quality of life perspectives. Data were derived from biographical narrative interviews and a visual function questionnaire with people with sight loss, and semi-structured interviews with professionals involved in the delivery of specialist visual impairment services.

Surveys suggest that public attitudes towards those experiencing poverty are harshly judgemental or view poverty and inequality as inevitable. But when people are better informed about inequality and life on a low income, they are more supportive of measures to reduce poverty and inequality.