communication

Communication is a two-way process. Effective communication can improve the quality of life for a person with dementia. However, experts highlight that people with dementia lack the opportunity to talk and express their feelings about the quality of their own life and services they receive.

Paper looking at the types of conversations which take place between doctors and patients, particularly concerning diabetes and mental illness. It concludes that doctors are learning to talk and listen to ever more assertive patients and that improving the quality of conversations is vital to empowerment and innovation.

This paper outlines the key findings from a study which examined the community care and mental health needs of, and current service provision for, sensory impaired adults in Scotland. The study involved a literature review, a mapping exercise of existing services, and consultation with service planners and providers and with service users and their carers. The research focussed on Deaf, deafened, blind, partially sighted and dual sensory impaired adults.

This BBC radio programme looks at how the number of people diagnosed with dementia in the UK has reached 700,000, and how, often close relatives step into the role of being the main carer.

Julie Heathcote is a trainer in reminiscence-based approaches for the Alzheimer’s Society which are proving to be successful in helping both carers and the cared for to spend more quality time together. Felicity Finch joins her with a group of carers at The Lowestoft and Waveney branch of the society where she ran a Reminiscence Activities session.

Summary report on the proposal to develop a training network in the North of Scotland. Such a network would facilitate joint working and provide mutual support on training and development issues. Consultation undertaken on behalf of the Scottish Social Services Learning Network North by Carol Smith.

These standards were developed to improve the quality of care and service for those in foster care. The standards cover the following activities: recruiting, selecting, approving, training and supporting foster carers; matching children and young people with foster carers; supporting and monitoring foster carers; and the work of agency fostering panels and other approval panels. The standards do not apply to the services provided directly by foster carers themselves.

This booklet has been written primarily for parents, carers and other family members when a child has been diagnosed as having an autistic spectrum disorder. It will also be of interest to those who are professionally involved, such as teachers, GPs, speech and language therapists and health visitors. This booklet gives information on some of the most common questions, suggests further publications and gives the addresses of useful organisations.

Resource that highlights how listening to children is an integral part of understanding what they are feeling and is key to helping children to make sense of differences.