communication

Dementia and Reminiscence (Radio 4: Woman's Hour)

This BBC radio programme looks at how the number of people diagnosed with dementia in the UK has reached 700,000, and how, often close relatives step into the role of being the main carer.

Julie Heathcote is a trainer in reminiscence-based approaches for the Alzheimer’s Society which are proving to be successful in helping both carers and the cared for to spend more quality time together. Felicity Finch joins her with a group of carers at The Lowestoft and Waveney branch of the society where she ran a Reminiscence Activities session.

Learning Network North Training Network Report May 2010

Summary report on the proposal to develop a training network in the North of Scotland. Such a network would facilitate joint working and provide mutual support on training and development issues. Consultation undertaken on behalf of the Scottish Social Services Learning Network North by Carol Smith.

Education of children in need

A study suggesting ways to improve communication between schools and children's services is discussed. The study 'Multi professional communication: making systems work for children' by Georgian Glenny and Caroline Roaf, examined case studies over a seven year period in order to identify the ingredients of successful communication systems.

Scottish good practice guidelines for supporting parents with learning disabilities

Guidance containing information and advice to help social work departments and other agencies support people with learning disabilities who become parents.

Men and crying (Radio 4 series: Woman's Hour)

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series discusses men and crying. Recent research found that British men are now more willing to admit to crying. Author, Mark Mason and psychiatrist, Jonathan Pimm talk to Jenni Murray about why it's increasingly acceptable for men to well up -and what they cry about.

Men talk (Radio 4 series: Thinking Allowed)

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on the stereotypes surrounding how men talk and what they talk about. If the stereotypes are to be believed, men either don’t talk very much, or talk compulsively and competitively about sport, cars and their latest drinking exploits.

Talking with your older patient : a clinician's handbook

What are effective ways to interact with older patients, particularly with those facing multiple illnesses, hearing and vision impairments, or cognitive problems? How does one approach sensitive topics such as driving privileges or assisted living? Are there special communication strategies that can help older patients who are experiencing confusion or memory loss? It is with these questions in mind, that the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institute of Health, developed this Handbook.

Getting it right: assessments for black and minority ethnic carers and service users

This learning resource will provide the learner with the necessary skills and knowledge to critically examine — from point of assessment to actual service delivery — how the needs of minority ethnic carers and service users are currently being met. It therefore aims to ensure that the need to achieve equality of opportunity and access lies at the heart of individual and collective practice.

The Children's hearing system in Scotland 2002: training resource manual

In 1996 the Scottish Office commissioned a complete revision of the existing guidance manual for Children's Panel members in order to bring it up to date, in particular for the new legislation. The Children (Scotland) Act 1995 was implemented in April 1997 and the Human Rights Act 1998 has since been introduced. Experience of working with the new legislation has brought about best practice guidelines.