divorce

Final report, which reflects conclusions following well over 600 responses to our consultation and input from meetings in many parts of the country. We have also had the benefit of the Justice Select Committee’s report on the operation of the family courts, published in July. This final report aims to be a free standing document but does not analyse the issues facing the family justice system in the detail of the interim report. It sets out final recommendations for reform, highlighting where these have changed and where they have not.

This review investigates the impact of parental separation and divorce on children’s well-being and development. The review incorporates evidence concerning family breakdown, and its consequences, in the context of understandings of ‘the family’, ‘breakdown’ and the ‘well-being’ of children and young people, and includes research relating to both married and cohabiting parents. ‘Well-being’ is defined as incorporating children’s mental, emotional and physical health.

This briefing presents the findings from a review of the impact of parental separation and divorce on children’s well-being and development. The review incorporated evidence concerning family breakdown and its consequences, and included research relating to both married and cohabiting parents. Findings are summarised in the areas of: family breakdown and its impact on children; contributory factors and optimising positive outcomes.

This resource is an archived webcast of 'The Future of Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy: A Conversation with Judith Wallerstein, Ph.D', that took place on Thursday, February 20, 2003 in the Alumni House of UC Berkeley.

N.B. This resource is no longer available

Understanding Childhood divorce and separation is a leaflet written by experienced child psychotherapists to give insight into the child’s feelings and view of the world and help parents, and those who work with children, to make sense of their behaviour.

Divorce is a powerful force in contemporary American family life. Current estimates suggest that between 43 and 50 percent of first-time marriages will end in divorce. Consequently, more than one million U.S. children experience parental divorce each year. The growing number of divorces has profound implications for children, mothers, fathers, and society. The consequences of these family changes for children and society are hotly debated. To bring clarity to this debate, this brief reviews current research about divorce and its consequences for children.