play

Strategy that is built on the views of children and young people, parents and carers, the play sector and others involved in their wellbeing. Together with the action plan it seeks to improve the play experiences of all children and young people, including those with disabilities or from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Document that continues the theme of partnership working as fundamental in the delivery of theEarly Years Framework.

It sets out issues which need to be taken forward together to turn the Framework’s ambitions into a reality; and highlights a range of case studies, showing how the principles of the Framework are being delivered across services and communities in Scotland.

Short summary of a detailed literature review, the Power of Play: an evidence base. It presents a strong body of evidence and expert opinion demonstrating the crucial role of play, especially outdoor play, in children’s enjoyment of their childhood, their health and their development. It also discusses the importance of creating spaces and opportunities where children can play freely in their local neighbourhoods.

Research briefing which is based on an online survey of 20 questions. The survey was administered in November and December 2011. Initially, childcare providers in Glasgow, East Ayrshire, West Lothian and the Shetland Isles were invited to participate, using a contact list provided by the Care Commission. Youth Scotland and the Scouts promoted awareness of the research through their ezines. Similarly, the Smartplay Network brought the research to the attention of toy library contacts.

Provides a comprehensive literature review of the benefits of play to children and the wider community, and acts as a supporting document to the Getting It Right for Play toolkit.

Toolkit for all those interested in evaluating and improving local outdoor play opportunities and experiences for children and young people in Scotland. It shows how to use four tools to collect and analyse sufficient information to measure against eight indicators.

Children and young people communicate in ways which are different from or additional to those used by adults This resource begins by exploring some of the reasons why children and young people communicate in these additional and alternative ways. It then goes on to describe ways of using stories, art work, creative writing and music as forms of communication.

This guide is a simple audit tool that can be used by children and young people to help them assess the safeguarding activities of the organisations they use. Developed by a group of children and young people, Kidscheck is a companion publication to Stopcheck . It is designed to enable children and young people to assess how well their club or activity group is doing in keeping them safe and happy. Kidscheck can be used with a variety of age groups.