law courts

Guide designed to minimise barriers people with learning disabilities may face when dealing with lawyers by giving information and advice on good practice in dealing sensitively with people with learning disabilities and their families or carers.

N.B. This resource is no longer available.

Pamphlet looking at the magnitude of domestic violence problems in England and Wales and what risks and benefits the proposals contained in the Domestic Violence, Crime & Victims Bill will present. It considers the dangers of introducing an inflexible system to deal with the wide range of domestic violence offences and offers a different, more flexible approach.

This resource presents an introduction to the Human Rights Act and how it works.

This Act brings the rights and freedoms of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) into UK jurisdiction.

This statement sets out the Scottish Executive’s policy for changes to the law of evidence and related aspects of court procedure, directed at providing specific help to vulnerable witnesses. It examines how the existing supports available to vulnerable witnesses could be improved.

Document from Victim Support in Scotland calling on the Scottish Parliament to continue its commitment to the Scottish Strategy for Victims and its key objectives of providing emotional and practical support, information and greater participation for victims. Specific actions it calls for include establishing a Victims Fund and appointing a Victims Commissioner.

'Courtroom skills' is suitable for a module or learning opportunity on working in courts. The object aims to: identify messages for effective courtroom practice; develop your understanding of the different roles in courtroom settings; help you manage your authority and role more effectively; develop your skills in negotiating out of court and in giving evidence; develop your knowledge, skills and confidence about cross examination.

Paper describing the Victim Statement (VS) scheme which was piloted in Ayr, Edinburgh and Kilmarnock between 2003 and 2005.

The scheme aimed to allow crime victims to make a statement about the impact of the offence on their lives once a decision to prosecute had been taken.

The paper also examines the practicalities of implementing the scheme more widely.

This Act of the Scottish Parliament relating to Criminal Procedure, is in four parts.

Part 1 deals with court procedures as they relate to the High Court of Justiciary.

Part 2 relates to trials in the High Court and the sheriff court. It also amends the time limits and citation provisions which are common to both courts.

Part 3 amends the provisions of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995 in relation to bail.

This Act of Scottish Parliament is in twelve parts: protection of the public at large; victims' rights; sexual offences; prisoners; drugs courts; non-custodial punishments; children; evidential, jurisdictional and procedural matters; bribery and corruption; criminal records; local authority functions; and a miscellaneous part which includes sections on offences aggravated by religious prejudice, wildlife offences and anti-social behaviour strategies.